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My advice is not to cover it up with anything. Once it starts there isn't but one way to fix it. Cut back to solid metal and replace. Can be a little intimidating if you haven't tried it before but this place is full of guys who learned on their own cars. I'm one of them. When I started on my car I had zero experience with sheet metal.
 

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My advice is not to cover it up with anything. Once it starts there isn't but one way to fix it. Cut back to solid metal and replace. Can be a little intimidating if you haven't tried it before but this place is full of guys who learned on their own cars. I'm one of them. When I started on my car I had zero experience with sheet metal.
Same here!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So far I have done the floor pans on this car. So I’m not too intimidated. So what would be best. Just cut out the cancer and replace with pieces of clean metal? Or should I replace the whole dash panel? Obviously the whole dash would probably be a nightmare.
 

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I'm with the rest, replace the panel and don't be surprised if there's more cancer on the panel below. I'm not sure what your overall vision is for the build but I needed a dash (damage, not rot) and decided to go with a 67 Camaro dash. The cars are basically the same and fits like a glove. Of course there's much more cost than factory and if you're a purist than I just basically cursed at you... Whatever you choose....Good luck and have fun!
 

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I'm currently restoring my 66. "Very little rust", so it seemed. I agree with the above, it all depends on your goal/vision. If you just want a driver quality, cut back to good metal and patch it in. Skim with filler and paint. Problem with this is there may be more cancer elsewhere under the dash panel that may appear later. This is probably the cheapest fix.

However, if you have any desire to restore the entire car (even in the future), I would probably replace the entire panel. It will be a learning curve if you've never done this before. But, its not just the destination, its about the journey.

Remember to keep the frame of mind that it's fun and enjoy the journey. If not, you may get burned out and fall out of love with it and never finish. Then you'll have a huge paper weight in the garage.

Most of us take years to finish our cars because we cant seem to successfully grow that money tree. So, patience is key.

Good luck and keep us posted with what you do
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah I’m basically in restore mode already. I have the whole front end and frame off. Interior is gutted. As far as the dash goes it will be staying stock. Already have a new cluster bezel for it. My basic vision for it is to make it a decent looking muscle car. Want it convert to a floor shift and put bucket seats in it.
 

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There will be cancer underneath. Fortunately for me once I cut the dash out it was all surface rust underneath but no holes. I was able to wire wheel all the rust off. The thickness of the metal was compromised in a couple of spots but not bad. I chose not to plug weld the front of the dash back on but rather used rivets. I wanted to get a good sealer between the metal since that's where moisture accumulates. I did not want to weld and burn up the sealer so that's why I chose rivets. Replacing the dash was one of the easier things to replace. When I ordered the dash it was stated it was for the Camaro and the Nova and it fit perfect. The only thing to be aware of is you will have to bend the metal right above where the dash bezel mounts for the Nova where the tinnerman clips slide on.
 

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72, 2 Dr, 383, 700r4
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its probably easier to replace the panel and be done, I would clean any rust off the panels it attaches to with a wire wheel also and treat it with a rust inhibitor. I would panel bond instead of weld that way you don't have to worry about blowing through a spot.

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_JM/collision-repair-jm/car-repair-and-refinish-processes/car-body-repair/panel-and-structural-bonding/
Yes blowing through was my other concern. I never thought of using bonding material. Not a bad idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Question about the lower corners where the windshield mounts. Is there usually bondo like material and such crude looking welds for the dash panel in this area.
 

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The answer is yes. Some of your welds were a little rougher than mine but similar. Where the little dash tabs weld to the "A pillar" it had inch long MIG wire hanging off the welds. Not much concern in the hidden area's.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I finally got around to work on my dash after doing some other things and stripping rust and putting por15 on from the cowl down to the firewall. So when I remove the upper metal dash panel there was like some kind of foam material that was between the panel and the pitch weld at the top of the cowl where the dash meets. I got it all mocked up and almost ready to weld it up. Should I put something similar to that foam material back in there?
 

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I saw that too. I just went and got some very small foam weather strip from the hardware store and laid it in that groove.
 
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