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Can anyone recommend a buffer,polisher that will last and not require a second mortgage?
 

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I have had my 7" dewalt electric corded buffer for about 7 years. You can find them on ebay for less than 150.00. I think its the best bang for the buck. Variable speed and variable trigger. You could get the harbor freight one but I have burnt those up in 2 days and I have had one last year. Not worth it in my opinion. The Milwaukee electric corded one is a little more money, but they are also heavier. I like to have a lighter buffer. People also like the makita buffers as they have a slow start feature.
 

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I've got a variable Makita that is over 10 years old! It's a work horse! Buffed countless cars and boats... Check the pawn shops - they may have a decent used one...
 

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Buffer Comments

I have a Milwaukee i recommend buying one second hand i got mine at a local flee market $90.00 i recommend if you get a used one clean it out if you buy quality it will last for ever i use mine to cut and buff with wool and foam and i have a orbital Porter Cable for the finish buff.

https://express.google.com/u/0/prod...Mbj674Dojr9uaN-X5T3DX_UuShOzROD0aAriMEALw_wcB

https://www.autogeek.net/porter-cable-7424xp.html

https://www.autogeek.net/dewalt-dwp849x-polisher.html

:yes::yes:
 

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Give me a little more info on what you'll be using it for, and I'd be happy to help make a recommendation.

Your own car(s)? Buffing paint for other people? Using it daily as a professional?

Old Paint? New Paint? Base/clear? Single stage paint?

What kind of buffing experience do you have?

Full disclosure; I work for RUPES, but I understand our tools/systems don't fit the bill for everyone out there.

https://rupesusa.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #7
71 in need of buffing

Thanks everyone. I guess it would make it easier if I showed ya'll what I want to buff out. Thanks for the info. I hadn't thought of pawn shops, but we do have a lot of them around here.
 

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Do you have any experience buffing/polishing?

I have a porter cable because a fella by the name of Dylan who I talked to on other forums and who also now works for Rupes advised me to buy because I was wanting to get my feet wet and it’s basically impossible to burn clear coat with it.

That said though it does take longer and does have its limitations in correcting power and a rupes in on my list but not budget currently.

Quick few passes with a Porter Cable with some older Adams polishes on a single stage paint job.







Give me a little more info on what you'll be using it for, and I'd be happy to help make a recommendation.



Your own car(s)? Buffing paint for other people? Using it daily as a professional?



Old Paint? New Paint? Base/clear? Single stage paint?



What kind of buffing experience do you have?



Full disclosure; I work for RUPES, but I understand our tools/systems don't fit the bill for everyone out there.



https://rupesusa.com/

What he said ^^^^^......chat with Nick here, I’ve read his posts elsewhere also and he’ll steer you in the right direction!



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I do body and paint and I also have a makita it’s gotta be at the 10-12 year old mark now never any troubles but I also bought a new dewalt as well just used it once to try nice machine so will keep for when the other one dies out and yes prob many pawn shops have some might be off the back of the truck specials lol but prob can pick one up for a decent price for sure
 

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Do you have any experience buffing/polishing?

I have a porter cable because a fella by the name of Dylan who I talked to on other forums and who also now works for Rupes advised me to buy because I was wanting to get my feet wet and it’s basically impossible to burn clear coat with it.

That said though it does take longer and does have its limitations in correcting power and a rupes in on my list but not budget currently.

Quick few passes with a Porter Cable with some older Adams polishes on a single stage paint job.




What he said ^^^^^......chat with Nick here, I’ve read his posts elsewhere also and he’ll steer you in the right direction!



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

That’s a great combo for a beginner who is just looking to shine up/maintain their own vehicles.

I worked at Adams with Dylan for a few years as well. Still have a LOT of Adams chemicals in my garage. Great stuff for the hobbyist, very effective, safe, and easy to use.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I've been using a cheapo Harbor Freight buffer, it's variable speed and works fine. For the DYI guy its works great. Get quality pads, wool and foam.
 

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we have about 15 buffers, I have tried many brands. At the start of the day it's a race to see who can get the Dewalt electric. Eventually they'll all be Dewalts with the D handle.

Your car may be a matte finish which won't buff to a shine.
 

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For polishing paint, you're safest using a Dual Action (or orbital) polisher.

Middle Of The Road/"Everyman" suggestion: Griot's Garage 6" orbital (~$150). It will do all that you need for a hobbyist doing an occasional paint correction. Their Boss 21 is the next big step up from that brand, but it's also more expensive.

Low-buck/"On a Budget": Harbor Freight 6" DA (~$55) While cheap, these have plenty of power and durability, and with a quality backing plate will do the job just fine. If you're worried about longevity of use, you can always take apart the head of the unit and pack it full of good grease. I have one that I've used for 5+ years on over a dozen vehicles, and it still works great. I've retired it to 3"/"cutting in" duty, but still use it frequently for smaller jobs, too.

Top Dollar/"Professional Use": Rupes Bigfoot or Flex 3401 (~$400+) These are the big boys of the playground and they do NOT mess around; they have substantial amounts of correcting power with unmatched smoothless and durability. While expensive, if you plan on doing 5+ cars a year, these are an investment in your time and fatigue. I bit the bullet and bought a Rupes Bigfoot LHR 15 Mark 2 this past year, and it as been a long time coming for the amount of paint corrections I do. Buttery smooth, wrecks RIDS with ease, and helps final steps finish down much, much quicker.


As with anything, any one of these machines is only as good as the pad and compound/polish you use with them. For all three, I'd suggest Lake Country flat foam pads for polishing and light compounding (they're available with different foam for different purposes), and for the heavy cutting, any name brand Microfiber cutting pad or Wool cutting pad will make quick work of the heavy stuff.

For compound, Meguiar's M100 is hard to beat for the money, performance, and ease of use.

For polish, Meguiar's M205 is a staple, and is also hard to beat for the money, performance, ease of use, and availability- most parts stores carry bottles of the stuff on the shelf.

Source: Been doing paint corrections, ceramic coatings, and other detail work for the past 4-5 years, and have done a ton of trial and error.





As previously said, it looks like your car has a matte finish on it; you likely won't be able to "polish" it to gloss paint. The clears/paints used are two separate worlds apart and behave as such.
 

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That’s a great combo for a beginner who is just looking to shine up/maintain their own vehicles.

I worked at Adams with Dylan for a few years as well. Still have a LOT of Adams chemicals in my garage. Great stuff for the hobbyist, very effective, safe, and easy to use.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Very much great for what I bought it for, owned it for a good 7-8 years now and before several of Dylan’s many endeavors, very helpful guy. Knew you worked there as well by visiting many other forums reading information/looking for stuff, both of you are very helpful!

For polishing paint, you're safest using a Dual Action (or orbital) polisher.

Middle Of The Road/"Everyman" suggestion: Griot's Garage 6" orbital (~$150). It will do all that you need for a hobbyist doing an occasional paint correction. Their Boss 21 is the next big step up from that brand, but it's also more expensive.

Low-buck/"On a Budget": Harbor Freight 6" DA (~$55) While cheap, these have plenty of power and durability, and with a quality backing plate will do the job just fine. If you're worried about longevity of use, you can always take apart the head of the unit and pack it full of good grease. I have one that I've used for 5+ years on over a dozen vehicles, and it still works great. I've retired it to 3"/"cutting in" duty, but still use it frequently for smaller jobs, too.

Top Dollar/"Professional Use": Rupes Bigfoot or Flex 3401 (~$400+) These are the big boys of the playground and they do NOT mess around; they have substantial amounts of correcting power with unmatched smoothless and durability. While expensive, if you plan on doing 5+ cars a year, these are an investment in your time and fatigue. I bit the bullet and bought a Rupes Bigfoot LHR 15 Mark 2 this past year, and it as been a long time coming for the amount of paint corrections I do. Buttery smooth, wrecks RIDS with ease, and helps final steps finish down much, much quicker.


As with anything, any one of these machines is only as good as the pad and compound/polish you use with them. For all three, I'd suggest Lake Country flat foam pads for polishing and light compounding (they're available with different foam for different purposes), and for the heavy cutting, any name brand Microfiber cutting pad or Wool cutting pad will make quick work of the heavy stuff.

For compound, Meguiar's M100 is hard to beat for the money, performance, and ease of use.

For polish, Meguiar's M205 is a staple, and is also hard to beat for the money, performance, ease of use, and availability- most parts stores carry bottles of the stuff on the shelf.

Source: Been doing paint corrections, ceramic coatings, and other detail work for the past 4-5 years, and have done a ton of trial and error.





As previously said, it looks like your car has a matte finish on it; you likely won't be able to "polish" it to gloss paint. The clears/paints used are two separate worlds apart and behave as such.


Very good information here as well :thumbsup: Thanks for going into detail, in a day of more Facebook information than forum posts stuff like this is very helpful when scouring the Internet.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I don't think its a matt finish. when I compounded a small section by hand it shined up pretty nice. I know it won't look like a new paint job, but hopefully some of the shine will come back. I think this is called mulsanne blue. Antway I like the shade of blue, so if a respray is in the cards I will keep it the same color. Cheaper too. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #20
it just looks like a matte finish. I was able to do a 2 ft section of the trunk lid before my old craftsman died and it did polish up.
 
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