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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here is a simple tool I made to measure the space available in the rear wheelhouse. You can measure height, width and back space with it.

You can buy similar tools, but this one cost me a couple screws and a small amount of labor.

What I used are a pair of cabinet door rails that I had laying around. I knew I wanted 26" tall tires so I made my jig 13" from center of wheel to the top of the "T". And the end piece was initially oversized by a few inches on either end, so it could be trimmed to fit.

In the first picture I had run the jig to the first point of contact (front of leaf spring), marked the wood and cut it off so that it would rotate past the spring.



Second picture shows the jig trimmed to fit at the next contact point (upper inner wheelhouse and wheel well lip).



This picture shows the jig trimmed for the third contact point (rear of leaf spring), this point was actually good and didn't need trimming.





After all the trimming you should be able to rotate the jig 360* and then remove and take all the measurements that you need.

Just be sure that when using this or any other device of the sort that you do so with the suspension under load so that you get an accurate measurement.
 

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Shade can you label each position to what it's doing. I'm likin this route it's better than buyin the other tool
 

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What do all the measurement numbers translate into?

Ok...the kids built the measuring tool and we now have measurements that I need to understand better.

Height: 26" -- I guess this means we can fit a 26" tire
Space from back side of wood towards shock: 6.50"
Space from front side of wood towards fender lip: 4.00"
Total width of top part of "T": 11.50"

What does this all translate into?

Thanks as always!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok...the kids built the measuring tool and we now have measurements that I need to understand better.

Height: 26" -- I guess this means we can fit a 26" tire
Space from back side of wood towards shock: 6.50"
Space from front side of wood towards fender lip: 4.00"
Total width of top part of "T": 11.50"

What does this all translate into?

Thanks as always!
Height 26" or 13" of stick times 2. Yes a 26" tire will fit, but you need to keep in mind your spring travel to make sure it wont rub.

The top measurement would be the width of the tire, not necessarily the tread width, but the width at the widest point of the tire.

Measurement from the back of the wood (or back of the rim) equals the optimum back spacing needed to fit your 26" tall by 11.5" wide tire. 6.5" of back spacing. For every inch of back spacing you subtract, also subtract an inch of width if you are keeping your front spacing the same.

Remember the measurement taken is for TOTAL back space, not the back space of the rim.

The front measurement should be from the back of the wood (back of the rim) to the front. Since wheel thicknesses differ it will help keep you standard when you are looking.


I do not claim to be a wheel and tire expert, actually very far from it, so use this info to help find what you need but do your due diligence research also. I don't want anyone coming at me because of a rubbing or blown tire.
 

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Hey Nightshade.....trust me I won't blame you but one more thing. We have found a potential new sponsor and they have offered to provide us with the following

Front: 18x7 with 4.50bs
Rear: 18x9.5 with 5.50bs

This darn project has been on hold due to the wheel issue and the old sponsor sent us the wrong rims and wouldn't even exchange them since it's under new leadership.

Your thoughts?
 

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great idea!

Here is a simple tool I made to measure the space available in the rear wheelhouse. You can measure height, width and back space with it.

You can buy similar tools, but this one cost me a couple screws and a small amount of labor.

What I used are a pair of cabinet door rails that I had laying around. I knew I wanted 26" tall tires so I made my jig 13" from center of wheel to the top of the "T". And the end piece was initially oversized by a few inches on either end, so it could be trimmed to fit.

In the first picture I had run the jig to the first point of contact (front of leaf spring), marked the wood and cut it off so that it would rotate past the spring.



Second picture shows the jig trimmed to fit at the next contact point (upper inner wheelhouse and wheel well lip).



This picture shows the jig trimmed for the third contact point (rear of leaf spring), this point was actually good and didn't need trimming.





After all the trimming you should be able to rotate the jig 360* and then remove and take all the measurements that you need.

Just be sure that when using this or any other device of the sort that you do so with the suspension under load so that you get an accurate measurement.
 

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I hope some of you guys realized that the outer piece of wood isn't the contact point the wheel will have, which is against the drum face, not the end(or "hub") of the axle... it does look like he added second piece of wood to the backside that is as thick as the "hub" of the axle, so his tool remains flat... & the overall backside avalible measurement is taken from that point...
Cars4kids: the tool can still be used to help find what 18" wheels/tires you can run... you will need to find the overall dia (26" in this case, 13" x 2) and the overall width of the tire and then check tire sizes until you find some in that range... Have you looked in the "tire sizes that fit" thread stickied somewhere on Steve's? I'd look in there to see what has been posted that others have tried or made fit...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I hope some of you guys realized that the outer piece of wood isn't the contact point the wheel will have, which is against the drum face, not the end(or "hub") of the axle... it does look like he added second piece of wood to the backside that is as thick as the "hub" of the axle, so his tool remains flat... & the overall backside avalible measurement is taken from that point...
Actually, it is a single piece of wood. Has a notch cut out of it for the area of the "end of the axle" so that the back side of the tool is resting on the drum, the proper contact point of the back side of the rim.:yes:
 
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