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Discussion Starter #1
Were these one color like black and then painted or were they molded into the color they were supposed to be.

I bought an excellent condition Gold Steering Wheel years ago but my interior is bright blue. I have a guy who can paint it the correct color but there is a guy here in California about 40 miles from me that restores steering wheels. He tears them down to the wires and then has an injection system to make it look factory in the color you want. I know two people that have had it done to their restored VW's and they look like factory new. But he is not cheap and I don't know yet if he only does Volkswagen. But my painter is not cheap and would maybe cost the same as the restored one if this guy does Chevrolet cars. So debating which way to go. If they were injection molded the interior color, then for sure I would go with the restorer but if they were painted then I have to make a decision on which way to go. Anyone ever hear of Kochs restoration?

If painted will the paint eventually wear off or chip?

Thanks for any input.

Michael
 

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I want to say I think that they’re painted. I restored one of my steering wheels and did a color change on one years ago and as I recall sanding it it was black underneath the steering wheel external color which was saddle color. I primed it and painted black it and it seem to come up pretty nice. This was on a first gen Nova SS.
 

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Kochs said they could paint my steering wheel but could not guarantee future cracks. They will basically make a mold of some sort of the original steering wheel and make a new one from scratch in the correct color. They want $450 so now I have to decide to pay $200 to paint or $450 for a solid color wheel guaranteed not to crack or fade. They do show cars and my friends 62 Bug's steering wheel came out factory correct. You cannot tell it is a solid color molded wheel.
 

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If you look at well worn original colored steering wheels, you'll notice black showing through the scuffs, nicks and scrapes. As far as I can determine, steering wheels in the mid 60's were a black polymer type composition. According to info about operations at the Norwood, Ohio, GM plant, steering wheels were made by a contracted supplier, then shipped to Chevrolet where they were painted the desired color. They were then placed in a low bake oven before being installed on the column.

The Norwood plant info indicates that body shells, including the interior sheet metal, were shipped to Chevrolet already painted in the scheduled color. The front inner and outer fenders were not painted by Fisher, but were done later by Chevrolet. Chevrolet also painted numerous other items, like steering wheels and columns, glove box doors, ashtray fronts, consoles, etc. This may explain the mismatches in colors and gloss ratios frequently seen in many interiors. The main interior sheet metal was painted by Fisher while numerous other components were painted by Chevrolet at a different time. The most glaring example is the mismatch in gloss ratio seen on 1st generation glove box doors and ashtray fronts. The trim color and gloss mismatches improved as the years went on, but was frequently evident in the 60's cars, especially it seems in blue interiors.

If anyone has additional info on these paint procedures, please post.

Bob
 

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If you look at well worn original colored steering wheels, you'll notice black showing through the scuffs, nicks and scrapes. As far as I can determine, steering wheels in the mid 60's were a black polymer type composition. According to info about operations at the Norwood, Ohio, GM plant, steering wheels were made by a contracted supplier, then shipped to Chevrolet where they were painted the desired color. They were then placed in a low bake oven before being installed on the column.

The Norwood plant info indicates that body shells, including the interior sheet metal, were shipped to Chevrolet already painted in the scheduled color. The front inner and outer fenders were not painted by Fisher, but were done later by Chevrolet. Chevrolet also painted numerous other items, like steering wheels and columns, glove box doors, ashtray fronts, consoles, etc. This may explain the mismatches in colors and gloss ratios frequently seen in many interiors. The main interior sheet metal was painted by Fisher while numerous other components were painted by Chevrolet at a different time. The most glaring example is the mismatch in gloss ratio seen on 1st generation glove box doors and ashtray fronts. The trim color and gloss mismatches improved as the years went on, but was frequently evident in the 60's cars, especially it seems in blue interiors.

If anyone has additional info on these paint procedures, please post.

Bob
Well written....
 

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That is exactly right Bob. The parts were not painted or color molded at the same time by the same company in the same plants. Some pieces came into the assembly plants either already painted or color molded from outside sources besides GM. You would be hard pressed to find 2 different items that match exactly in a colored interior, the colors are usually close and considered acceptable to match . That is what makes a colored interior so difficult to duplicate. There may be as many as 7 or 8 different shades to match from the backsides of original parts to make them appear the way they originally were done.

Jack
 

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I know about Koch's. I know their VW steering wheels look dynamite, but they have molds for all of those wheels to cast new ones. They do NOT have molds for a Nova wheel, definitely not for the one year only '66 wheel.

They were originally black with color painted on them.
 

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I have a black restored wheel on my chevelle and several years later theres is many white specks showing,paint flaking?likely.
poor job done ? mabe.
I would go with colour injection.jmo
 

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Thanks guys. After much discussion I am going with paint. My painter is top notch so he should know what to do to make it last. Like I said the steering wheel is in excellent shape with no cracks or hair lines. Got it in the 90's and hasn't been touched since.

I do agree with Bob .... if painted --- it will (sooner-or-later) , start too show through. (From an old paint-&-body man ..... that has painted afew str. wheels). some may take longer than others : depending on type paint- & - prep.

kinda , comes down to --- Is Your Nova a Keeper or just a 'Flipper' (later, down th' road). ---- (mines a keeper ! ).

it's your money & your Nova ......................... u-get-what-you-pay-for ...... so too speak ....... (mostly).

... jim
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The car is a keeper but I will not put that many miles a year on it. Just a weekend Cars and Coffee, Starbucks or Ruby's Diner kind of driving. Less than 500 miles a year and that would be a busy year if I do the Temecula Rod Run or a Nova cruise. I work a lot even on the weekends so getting out to enjoy will be minimal till I retire and then I won't be able to afford to drive it. :no:
 
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