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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would you rather have more displacement with less boost or less displacement with more boost? Lets say the goal is to get 750-800hp.

lsx376 with 14-15psi should be able to do that or a ls3 427 stroker with around 8psi could also do it. Which is more preferable?
 

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That all depends, what car is it going in, and how will the car be used? What's your budget? Is the horsepower number listed above a personal goal, or a restriction for a racing class?

There is no "one size fits all". If you have to ask how you should get 750hp+, you're probably not on board with what it takes to handle it.
 

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My 2010 Camaro has 716 rwhp and it is a handful to keep straight, and that's in a car pretty much designed for some serious hp. I'd say getting that kind of hp to the rear of a nova is going to require some serious chassis work to drive safely. I know the 434 in my 67 has 585hp, has an IFS, 4-link, welded frame connectors and it's somewhat unpredictable when I really lay into it. I would do some research as to what others are doing when the hp gets up into what you are looking to do to drive it safely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My 2010 Camaro has 716 rwhp and it is a handful to keep straight, and that's in a car pretty much designed for some serious hp. I'd say getting that kind of hp to the rear of a nova is going to require some serious chassis work to drive safely. I know the 434 in my 67 has 585hp, has an IFS, 4-link, welded frame connectors and it's somewhat unpredictable when I really lay into it. I would do some research as to what others are doing when the hp gets up into what you are looking to do to drive it safely.
Good to know. I would like to be somewhere around 600-650 whp so maybe I dont necessarily need 800 at the crank that was just used as an example. My brother has a 70 chevelle which I know is a full frame car but hes got ~600whp and its a hell of a ride but not super out of control or anything.
 

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My 2 cents: No matter how much horsepower your end goal is, it's the end-use that should dictate how you get there.

Big motors have more "grunt" by design (more work being done for every combustion cycle) and typically fair well with a heavy car that is just going to spend its life lumbering around, car show to car show. You don't need to wringe their neck to make power. However, they also need to be "fed" more when you spin then up to make power. IE: more fuel, more air, and a larger exhaust. This means more cost to both build and use on the regular; probably not the best bet for a car you want to put a ton of miles on, especially on a budget.

By contrast, smaller-displacing motor will require less "exotic" parts to make good power, albeit less than a larger counterpart. Additionally, a small motor will be more efficient (ie: use less fuel) when cruising around due to having a smaller displacement of air and fuel for every carnot combustion cycle. They won't have the exact same "pull" from the bottom, but you can get the same effect, proportionally, if you put the package together properly,especially if you build a bullet that will rev to 7,000RPM. This works awesome in lighter cars, especially if you have access to an overdrive transmission to keep short gears in the back.

Personally... I prefer light cars with smaller motors that like to rev and require a little finesse to wheel around. I'm aiming to ditch the coal-factory 6.6L 400 small block in my car now for a much smaller 4.8 or 5.3 LS in the near future with a stick. It won't be as violent out of the hole, but it will vastly outweighed by being engaging to drive and being much more fuel efficient.

400hp in a light, well-set-up car can be more terrifying and fun than a 600hp motor in a heavy slob with the wrong equipment. After all, the whole point of building a fun car is so you can drive it, not sit on the internet and brag about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My plan for now is to buy a ls3 long block crate engine, put in a bigger cam and then add a magnuson blower. I dont necessarily have a specific purpose im building for. Not a drag car. Just want a fun street machine that can go to a track once in a while.
 

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My plan for now is to buy a ls3 long block crate engine, put in a bigger cam and then add a magnuson blower. I dont necessarily have a specific purpose im building for. Not a drag car. Just want a fun street machine that can go to a track once in a while.
Sounds like that's a fantastic starting place.

I'd go so far as to start with the LS3 and the cam to start, and leave the blower for when you want more on tap (assuming you have the intake and other stuff already on a motor).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sounds like that's a fantastic starting place.

I'd go so far as to start with the LS3 and the cam to start, and leave the blower for when you want more on tap (assuming you have the intake and other stuff already on a motor).
I’m starting from scratch, I have nothing on hand now, so I was going to just go for it all at once.
 

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I chose to build an engine capable of turbocharging at a later date. I have two engines, a SBC and a 5.3 aluminum LS. Both have ring gaps cut for boost. Both put out around 400+ HP If I ever get anxious for more power I don't have to go backwards.
 
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