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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Im swapping heads for the first time and have spent a number of hours scrapping with a razor blade and carb cleaner, I still have to touch up a few areas but for 99 percent of them so far they are smooth to the touch and finger nail. I plan on going over with 220grit sand paper on a long block as recommended by my local engine shop. How do they look so far? I plan on using the engine tech gasket I got from rock auto looks very similar to the felpro one.
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also will it effect the seal if I made light scratches with the blade in a few areas, they're so light you cannot even feel them.
 

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and my experience has led me to using a clean 90%+ Iso alcohol to wipe the mating surfaces before applying anything to bare steel or aluminum. It helps remove any residue and will allow the gasket surface to mate and bond with the metals better. Some use lacquer thinner and that works too I guess, never tried it though so I'm sure others can suggest things I have not... Whatever you do though, make sure everything has off-gassed or evaporated before touching the gaskets to the surface or your hands...
 

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Try to use something straighter and stiffer for the sand paper. I use a big file wrapped in sandpaper
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So I noticed this gouge between the cylinders where the gasket blew, I can catch it with my finger nail pretty easily, the shop wants 400 for a resurface which I cant afford anyone know what I should do? Even if I could get a summer out of a head gasket I would do that.
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So I noticed this gouge between the cylinders where the gasket blew, I can catch it with my finger nail pretty easily, the shop wants 400 for a resurface which I cant afford anyone know what I should do? Even if I could get a summer out of a head gasket I would do that.
Can't quite make out the gouge... any way to point it out or take another pic from further away them zoom in on it? There are a few ways to handle this that don't involve going to the shop for a deck... but without knowing what we're dealing with, tough to comment.

If this is the gouge, it looks like someone dropped the corner of a cylinder head onto it (or when they cleaned it, got it with the edge of a circular grinder/scrubber/flapper/etc. which is a huge no no on head mating surfaces on ANY engine...:
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh, and don't use steel-shim head gaskets on this type of gouge... they'll leak right away
That is what I was looking at in the highlight, I only used a razor blade and was very careful taking heads off, so I assume it was from a previous person. What options would you suggest? and what gasket? I plan on rebuilding the bottom end in the next year or too so if I can just even make it till then Id be happy.
 

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That is what I was looking at in the highlight, I only used a razor blade and was very careful taking heads off, so I assume it was from a previous person. What options would you suggest? and what gasket? I plan on rebuilding the bottom end in the next year or too so if I can just even make it till then Id be happy.
Did you buy the C350HS-A head gasket kit?
 

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I was thinking maybe using jb weld to fill it in?
So, if you clean the groove out really well and use the tiny tip of a razor blade (just the tip) to clean and scrape the gouge out, you could probably get away with filling it with some cold weld like permatex 14600 or loctite fixmaster 2000. Just apply it as directed in a very tiny quantity and sand it lightly with a straight flat bar wrapped with emery cloth like 800 grit to start (that may just do the trick) until the gouge is filled and smooth to the touch then gasket job, torque sequence and incremental ramp, and volia! No leaks for a while, if ever. The loctite fixmaster 2000 is good to 2000°F which would be my go-to for this temporary fix. It may do the trick permanently as the space is very small.... although it is in the most critical location between cylinders... so... taking your chances but it should work in the interim for a year or so.

Good luck!! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So, if you clean the groove out really well and use the tiny tip of a razor blade (just the tip) to clean and scrape the gouge out, you could probably get away with filling it with some cold weld like permatex 14600 or loctite fixmaster 2000. Just apply it as directed in a very tiny quantity and sand it lightly with a straight flat bar wrapped with emery cloth like 800 grit to start (that may just do the trick) until the gouge is filled and smooth to the touch then gasket job, torque sequence and incremental ramp, and volia! No leaks for a while, if ever. The loctite fixmaster 2000 is good to 2000°F which would be my go-to for this temporary fix. It may do the trick permanently as the space is very small.... although it is in the most critical location between cylinders... so... taking your chances but it should work in the interim for a year or so.

Good luck!! :)
Thanks! Should I stick with the headgasket I have from that kit for this application?
 

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Yeah, those aren't too bad for a budget build and they have seals, rather than a steel-shim composition so any small irregularities in the head/block mating surfaces should be taken care of. Just remember to assemble everything CLEANNNNNNNN as can be (and lube your head bolt threads and the washers (if used) and the underside of your bolt head where it mates with the washer/head surface for proper torque readings and a nice smooth read/insertion/thread mating [you may want to chase your block threads lightly with a chaser tap for a good solid read/torque too]). 90% or better isopropyl alcohol is your go-to cleaner, just be sure to let it evaporate completely before getting the gasket near it. Cleanliness makes everything last longer and bond correctly. You may follow the old adage of re-torquing the heads after a few heat cycles... not sure, maybe others could offer their $0.02 here on that. Using these gaskets, I'm not sure as I've not tried this brand before however I read some decent reviews for the price point, not a bad gasket kit...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah, those aren't too bad for a budget build and they have seals, rather than a steel-shim composition so any small irregularities in the head/block mating surfaces should be taken care of. Just remember to assemble everything CLEANNNNNNNN as can be (and lube your head bolt threads and the washers (if used) and the underside of your bolt head where it mates with the washer/head surface for proper torque readings and a nice smooth read/insertion/thread mating [you may want to chase your block threads lightly with a chaser tap for a good solid read/torque too]). 90% or better isopropyl alcohol is your go-to cleaner, just be sure to let it evaporate completely before getting the gasket near it. Cleanliness makes everything last longer and bond correctly. You may follow the old adage of re-torquing the heads after a few heat cycles... not sure, maybe others could offer their $0.02 here on that. Using these gaskets, I'm not sure as I've not tried this brand before however I read some decent reviews for the price point, not a bad gasket kit...
Thanks! I’ve been using brake cleaner and lacquer thinner so far, for lubing the head bolts should I just use assembly lube? My machine shop who did the heads for me said to stay away from jb weld and just use a sand block to get them smooth then use the gasket and it should hopefully seal any thoughts on this info?
 

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I would not use JB weld unless it is the 2000 as the rest are not temperature rated. The Permatex stuff works well. I have used it to fill a few gouges in an aluminum head surface and it has bee on the vehicle problem-free for at least 60k miles.
 

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Thanks! I’ve been using brake cleaner and lacquer thinner so far, for lubing the head bolts should I just use assembly lube? My machine shop who did the heads for me said to stay away from jb weld and just use a sand block to get them smooth then use the gasket and it should hopefully seal any thoughts on this info?
When you put the head bolts in, be sure to use dedicated thread sealant on them- the head bolt holes are not blind and go directly into the water jacket.
 
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