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If you have a wiring package that is labled on each wire to show its destination, you are ahead of the game.

Hopefully, this is what you have.

Seperate the wires for the rear of the car; those that go under the hood, and those that stay inside the car.

Do as much as you can, then ask specific questions here and definitely use the help line for the company that sold it to you.

I did a quick search for a video and found several. Here is a sample, even though it is not for your car:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...0E09BB59C0C78240E4890E&view=detail&FORM=VIRE4
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you have a wiring package that is labled on each wire to show its destination, you are ahead of the game.

Hopefully, this is what you have.

Seperate the wires for the rear of the car; those that go under the hood, and those that stay inside the car.

Do as much as you can, then ask specific questions here and definitely use the help line for the company that sold it to you.

I did a quick search for a video and found several. Here is a sample, even though it is not for your car:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...0E09BB59C0C78240E4890E&view=detail&FORM=VIRE4
Yes, Got AAW classic update kit, and have everything. I am trying to get my car started up at least so I am doing the engine part first. I was looking at some of those vids but can't seem to find what I need. Kinda stressing, but I know I shouldn't be.
 

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Yes, Got AAW classic update kit, and have everything. I am trying to get my car started up at least so I am doing the engine part first. I was looking at some of those vids but can't seem to find what I need. Kinda stressing, but I know I shouldn't be.
Sometimes things can be overwhelming but take a break and come back to it.

I glanced at the harness you have (I'm thinking it is the 500878 ?) and I know you stated that you want to get the car started but don't rush these things. It's easy to rush and make mistakes and I don't think you want to butcher things up doing a quick job just to get it running.

Get the wires that are to be in the engine bay routed into the engine bay. If the wires are attached to the fuse block, try and get the fuse block in place temporarily to where then you can work under the hood and group wires that have to go to different area's. Use some wire ties and get them grouped and run to the different area's and if you forgot a wire or want to run it a different or cleaner way, cut the cable ties loose and redo it. Cable ties are cheapso burn them up if needed. I would then leave the wires run long for right now once they are to their destination and to keep the spaghetti down, loop up the excess and put a cable tie around it. Once you are happy with the routing then cut the excess off and properly put on the apropriate end on the wire (and solder it if you can).

Looking at the diagram it shows a main feed wire off of the starter as well as a starter solenoid wire, and an alternator wire and these can get close to exhaust parts which can melt the insulation either right away or down the road so keep the wires away from the heat as much as you can.

Keep in mind too that the engine will move around a little in the motor mounts as well as some flex in the body so you don't want things stretched tight.

Once you get the underhood done, then go after the column wiring. After that attack the rear wiring.

Jim
 

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72 Frame off, bare metal resto-mod. 383, TH350, Eaton Posi, Complete new suspension, disk brakes
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Take it slow

I also did the AAW kit on my 72. I found it pretty straightforward, BUT, I'm an Aerospace toolmaker by trade, so I had a bit of an advantage. The nice thing is that all of the wires are labeled, but that can be a challenge when you need a wire that isn't in the fuse block as it arrives in the kit, or when you have something that isn't completely stock.
PM me and we can get on the phone to work some of these things out. It can be a pita, but I'm happy to help if I can. -p-
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sometimes things can be overwhelming but take a break and come back to it.

I glanced at the harness you have (I'm thinking it is the 500878 ?) and I know you stated that you want to get the car started but don't rush these things. It's easy to rush and make mistakes and I don't think you want to butcher things up doing a quick job just to get it running.

Get the wires that are to be in the engine bay routed into the engine bay. If the wires are attached to the fuse block, try and get the fuse block in place temporarily to where then you can work under the hood and group wires that have to go to different area's. Use some wire ties and get them grouped and run to the different area's and if you forgot a wire or want to run it a different or cleaner way, cut the cable ties loose and redo it. Cable ties are cheapso burn them up if needed. I would then leave the wires run long for right now once they are to their destination and to keep the spaghetti down, loop up the excess and put a cable tie around it. Once you are happy with the routing then cut the excess off and properly put on the apropriate end on the wire (and solder it if you can).

Looking at the diagram it shows a main feed wire off of the starter as well as a starter solenoid wire, and an alternator wire and these can get close to exhaust parts which can melt the insulation either right away or down the road so keep the wires away from the heat as much as you can.

Keep in mind too that the engine will move around a little in the motor mounts as well as some flex in the body so you don't want things stretched tight.

Once you get the underhood done, then go after the column wiring. After that attack the rear wiring.

Jim
Alright, I'll try and take it slow and make sure I get the right and appropriate tools. Preciate your help.
 

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In the past, I've installed most of the major aftermarket harnesses and since I sell AAW products, this may sound bias but their instructions/wiring diagrams are the best I've seen. The 1st few jobs I did were somewhat hetic, but as mentioned by Custom Jim, take a step back and reorganize. AAW classic update kit includes all the terminals and connector bodies you need to complete the install. If it seems confusing, just follow the installation proceedures in the instructions and don't try to ad-lib and/or cut corners. As for tools you will need, a good set of wire-strippers and crimpers are essential. All terminals in this kit are crimp-type they DO NOT need to be soldered. That will just create extra work for you and is unnessary so long as you make good crimps. Here is the crimp tool I recommend. Others here at SNS have used it with great results.
it costs a few bucks but really delivers. Heck the AAW kit even includes a bag of extra terminal that can be used to practice your crimps on....good luck and Read, Read, Read the instructions. Post here if you have problems and or you can pm me if you like.

Frank
 

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Here is the crimp tool I recommend. Others here at SNS have used it with great results.
http://www.amazon.com/Tool-Aid-18920-Ratcheting-Terminal/dp/B0002STTTI/ref=pd_sbs_auto_1

Frank
Hey Frank, I have the Packard crimpers for 56 style and weather-pac. About a c-note a piece. Love um but tell me about that set from Amazon. Do they do the Metri-Pac terminals and what are the other dies for?

To the original poster…

Think about your house. They run the big wires from the pole to the house first (battery cables and main power distribution). Set the breaker panel (fuse box). Land all the outlets, switches and junction boxes (headlights, ignition, fuel punp, distributor, ect.) And then lastly, they string wire between all of them. That’s the same way it should be done on a car. Land everything electrical first and then wire it up.

Steve
 

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Hey Frank, I have the Packard crimpers for 56 style and weather-pac. About a c-note a piece. Love um but tell me about that set from Amazon. Do they do the Metri-Pac terminals and what are the other dies for?

To the original poster…

Think about your house. They run the big wires from the pole to the house first (battery cables and main power distribution). Set the breaker panel (fuse box). Land all the outlets, switches and junction boxes (headlights, ignition, fuel punp, distributor, ect.) And then lastly, they string wire between all of them. That’s the same way it should be done on a car. Land everything electrical first and then wire it up.

Steve
Here is a more complete description of the tool aid 18920 kit. Amazon still has the best price I've seen on this kit.

http://www.tooltopia.com/tool-aid-18920.aspx

Frank
 

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I just started and already am having troubles and getting angry. Is there any Vids out there that go step by step?
The best way to approach this is with a plan. Know what you are doing, and use the internet to research what you are unclear of. As has been said, the AAW kit is about as simple and straightforward as can be. What are you issues your running into? Wire routing?

Dont let the harness get the better of you. That many wires can be a pain, so take the extra few seconds to maintain it. I always keep mine as clean as possible, and taped or ziptied up so your just handling one fat bundle of wires. Route em & mount em.

Personally, I like to tape up or insulate my harnesses with sleeves over the bundle of either with tape or other things like spiral cut plastic loom or an expandable braided sleeve. This helps protect against abrasions and heat a bit. Where the circuits break off of the main harness, I like to tape those up in most cases for a cleaner install depending on what it is. And having decent tools makes all the difference in the world.

The cleaner you mount your electrical now, the easier your life is going to be later. You can PM me if you have questions.

Hey Frank, I have the Packard crimpers for 56 style and weather-pac. About a c-note a piece. Love um but tell me about that set from Amazon. Do they do the Metri-Pac terminals and what are the other dies for?


Steve
I am not sure about metri pac terminals. They have 5 die sets for different crimps. One is for Delphi packard double crimps, but I have found these to work only on the 56 series FEMALE terminals, as the male terminals have locking tabs that do not allow the terminal to be crimped in the jaws without being smashed up. And they are more of a 'universial' type of crimp. Its not a Delphi tool, but they get a decent double crimp where you need the conductor AND the insulator crimped. This is a single action double crimp. (I have delphi tools, and although slim, there is a difference in quality.)

The other 4 dies are for insulated terminals, non insulated terminals of various sorts. I do not have the box in front of me or Id be able to tell you exactly and give you the different die numbers. Overall its a pretty good tool, and for $70 its worth it if your going to do a lot of crimping, but changing the dies twice for a single crimp when you want to switch functions doing a 7 wire rear body harness can be a pain.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yea I'm just taking a step back and thinking stuff over. I have a PoS crimper so I will just buy a nicer one that will crimp correctly. I guess that was my main issue and I was just being a little girl. But also it just seemed a little confusing on where all the stuff goes. I'll just take it slow and definitely ask questions.
 

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Yea I'm just taking a step back and thinking stuff over. I have a PoS crimper so I will just buy a nicer one that will crimp correctly. I guess that was my main issue and I was just being a little girl. But also it just seemed a little confusing on where all the stuff goes. I'll just take it slow and definitely ask questions.
You have a lot of crimps to make and after all that work you want the wiring to be reliable. The 100 dollars you spend now will seem like nothing by the time you finish. I have wired 3 cars and having the proper crimper(s) is a life saver.

I think it was already mentioned but the AAW web site has a great video on how to properly use the Delphi/Packard 56 style terminal crimper.

In addition to the packard crimper you need these. This is probably the best general purpose crimper for non insulated barrel connectors and ring terminals I have ever used. Available at Home Depot for around 30 bucks.


Go ahead and get these stripers because you can strip small wire without losing any strands. These go down to 18 gauge but the red handles go down to 22 gauge. I have both.

 

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I rewired my 66 Fairlane with a Painless generic kit. Before I even got started, I got a stock wiring diagram and studied it to try to burn it in my mind on what I was doing, and what I was replacing etc...

Then I reviewed the wiring diagram and instructions from Painless and plotted it out in my mind how I was going to go about it. I did all this before I even cut the first wire.

Then I spent about two weekends just psyching myself up to do it and reviewing all my notes etc... Finally decided enough is enough and I dove in. Finished it after a full Saturday and an hour or so on Sunday. Tested everything and only had one tiny issue.. burned bulb.

The real key is planning and taking your time. Also, don't connect to the battery until everything is done and all properly grounded etc.. You don't want to have a circuit burn up because you applied power and it wasn't properly grounded.

It can be a bit overwhelming if you try to look at it as a whole. But, if you focus on individual sections.. engine compartment, interior, rear, it goes pretty quickly. Everything everyone else has said is spot on.

Just don't get into a hurry and don't be afraid to walk away for a few mins to clear your head.

Mike
 

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The AAW harness will come with the factory “56” style connectors and not “Weather-Pac’s”. Watch the video. They have a wire crimp and a separate insulation crimp. AAW has a tool rental program. Not sure if it cost anything or when you return it they credit all your money back like some auto parts places do.

Steve
 
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