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Your link doesn't work. Are you looking for a multimeter for handheld use or an ammeter gauge to permanently install?

For a handheld unit Lowe's, Home Depot, or your other local hardware store has them. I have a cheap digital multimeter from Home Depot that I use for everything and it works fine. Used it during from-scratch wiring EFI harness builds, digital circuit design, etc. Cost me no more than $20. Anything more than that is overkill for most people.

For a permanently installed unit, most, if not all, of the automotive gauge manufacturers have models.

Autozone may have one or both, but I don't shop there when I can avoid it.
 

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dose it have all the settings and such that i need?
Yep, it appears to have everything on it: voltmeter (AC & DC), ammeter (DC), ohmmeter, and continuity tester.

I get the most use out of the ohmmeter and continuity tester for auto work - finding shorts and building harnesses.
 

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Just don't use it on household wiring. Those cheap multimeters don't have overload protection.

If you forget to switch it to the correct position and measure Ohms on a house outlet - you introduce a short to the circuit. WHAM!! ZAPPO!!! :eek:

I had a college professor that used one of those cheap meters to see if there was current going to a 480V outlet. He forgot it was set to Ohms. KA-BLOOIE!! 2 foot long plasma stream melted all the skin off his hands. He sure taught the class a lesson they'd never forget!! :eek::D:devil::turn:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just don't use it on household wiring. Those cheap multimeters don't have overload protection.

If you forget to switch it to the correct position and measure Ohms on a house outlet - you introduce a short to the circuit. WHAM!! ZAPPO!!! :eek:

I had a college professor that used one of those cheap meters to see if there was current going to a 480V outlet. He forgot it was set to Ohms. KA-BLOOIE!! 2 foot long plasma stream melted all the skin off his hands. He sure taught the class a lesson they'd never forget!! :eek::D:devil::turn:
haha i could picture that but no this is just for the nova and its electric needs to find my power draw and fix it
 

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I saw those in the HF store two weeks ago and they we're actually less than $4.99, I think they were $3.99. I didn't pick one up and examine it, however I found it interesting enough to circle back around and take a second glance.

What I like about that meter is it's not auto-ranging. Even though Auto-ranging features cost more money, I've always found them to be a pain in the ***. Auto-ranging meters have the same dumbing-down effects that calculators have had on people as well.

Even though it's fused specs are to .2A, I can clearly see in the picture it has a 10 Amp plug (unfused). That is the plug you will be using to measure drain on your car and that's also the plug you will kill this meter with (by forgetting to switch the lead back when you go to measure voltage). Which is actually a great reason to get a couple of these, provided they're accurate.

I'd like to know if these meters are UL listed. I doubt it.


Just don't use it on household wiring. Those cheap multimeters don't have overload protection.

If you forget to switch it to the correct position and measure Ohms on a house outlet - you introduce a short to the circuit. WHAM!! ZAPPO!!! :eek:

I had a college professor that used one of those cheap meters to see if there was current going to a 480V outlet. He forgot it was set to Ohms. KA-BLOOIE!! 2 foot long plasma stream melted all the skin off his hands. He sure taught the class a lesson they'd never forget!! :eek::D:devil::turn:
I can understand someone forgetting to switch the leads out of the 10A slot, but not setting your meter correctly....well....that's why that guy is a professor:D

Then again, now that I have thought about it, who in their right mind would measure a current draw with a DMM on a 440 circuit? What class was this? I hope it wasn't an Engineering class.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ya dont know much about meters but that one looks good and seems to have what i need to fix my problem, unless theres others one i should look at?
 

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"Then again, now that I have thought about it, who in their right mind would measure a current draw with a DMM on a 440 circuit? What class was this? I hope it wasn't an Engineering class. "


I have a Fluke rated 500VAC and amp circuit rated 10A. ( fused )

I would not hesitate to check your 440 VAC circuit with it.
 

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"Then again, now that I have thought about it, who in their right mind would measure a current draw with a DMM on a 440 circuit? What class was this? I hope it wasn't an Engineering class. "


I have a Fluke rated 500VAC and amp circuit rated 10A. ( fused )

I would not hesitate to check your 440 VAC circuit with it.
Right, assuming your measuring voltage. I took what 69LT1Nova wrote literally...which would be a catastrophe.
 

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Right, assuming your measuring voltage. I took what 69LT1Nova wrote literally...which would be a catastrophe.
I was referring to the previous post about checking current.

It is a matter of knowing what you are doing. If you are reasonably sure the circuit is less than ten amps, then checking it with the 10A circuit poses no problem. If the circuit does happen to pull more than 10A, still no problem, you just have to replace the fuse and NOW YOU KNOW.. the circuit is over 10A.

Exceeding the rated VOLTAGE of the meter is hazardous. Exceeding the rated AMPERAGE ( in an amps check ) will only pop the fuse.

Of course, setting the meter to the correct function is vital, and one would do well to double check every time. Another feature of my Fluke digital which I like, is the way it will 'scream' if it is put across voltage while set to ohms. yeah, it happens from time to time, and a good meter will save you from your own stupidity.

Personally, I prefer a clamp on, but the meter is designed with the function, and if you know what you are doing it is perfectly safe to use.
 

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Of course, setting the meter to the correct function is vital, and one would do well to double check every time. Another feature of my Fluke digital which I like, is the way it will 'scream' if it is put across voltage while set to ohms. yeah, it happens from time to time, and a good meter will save you from your own stupidity.
Yep, exactly.

FYI - I am an engineer for Fluke. :D We make the best in the business. Period. :yes:

PS - the best part about my above story: the class was "Fundamentals of Electric Motors", a 400 level engineering class with a lab. Some people are teachers, others are educators. This man was an EDUCATOR. I'll never use anything other than a Fluke meter.

PSS - if you saw the professor today, you can tell that he was wearing a long sleeve shirt due to the burns on his hands and face/neck. He tells every class his forgetful story! Makes a big impact, especially with the scars.
 
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