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Discussion Starter #1
I got the Aerospace AC 205 front brake kit for my 65. Before buying I e-mailed them and also talked to them on phone, asking if any spindle modifications were required. Both times I was told no. Putting the kit on today, the rather vague and generic instructions say to use the 5/8 bolt in the top hole of the spindle. For the bottom caliper bracket mounts 1/2 inch bolts are supplied with the kit, along with the bracket holes being drilled for 1/2 bolts. My 65 has 7/16 original bolts that go through the spindles and steering arms. The holes are not large enough for the 1/2 bolts. Has anyone done this install before and run into this? Looks like I might have to drill my spindles/ steering arms, which I'm guessing are some pretty hard stuff, for the larger bolts. It's Saturday and Aerospace is only open weekdays.
 

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Yes, you will have to drill the holes to 1/2"; this is normal for a disc brake swap on a 1st gen. Is the caliper bracket designed to accommadate the raised boss on the upper mount? On a typical oem retrofit you would have to cut/mill that area down to be parallel with the lower mount.
I think 67 spindles had the 1/2" holes as that was the first year discs were offered.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Shawn it looks like the upper bracket hole will not have issues. The kit includes a lockwasher that installs between the lower mounting bracket and spindle, to space the bracket out paralell to the upper boss. Also some thin shims (washers) are included to align the bracket with the disc. This kit is impressive as far as looks and quality goes. The instructions and illustrations could be quite a bit more specific, as they look like they are generic for a multitude of applications, but don't detail any one very good.
 

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I had to drill out my arms on the 66 on a retrofit. Yes the spindles and arms are hard. The key is to keep the drill bit from heating. Keep the RPMs down. A low speed, high torque drill is recommended. Drill motor that can drive a 1/2" chuck usually is good. When I say low speed, I mean 500-700 RPM. 1000 is too high from my experience and will heat and take the tip off most steel drills.

Good to have a grinder to be able to resharpen the drill as needed.
 

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I had a machinist modify my spindles for my disc conversion. He also had to drill the holes as you do, and said that he used a lot of coolant to aid the drilling.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok. I drilled the rear spindle holes/steering arms for the 1/2 bolts. Started putting everything together for mock up. Got the hub/disc assembly mounted, the caliper mounting bracket mounted. Upon trying to mount the caliper to the bracket, there is interference with the lower caliper bracket to caliper mounting bolt (3/8) with the steering arm. There is not enough room to install this bolt with the steering arm on. I cannot install the steering arm last because the caliper mounting bracket bolts that go through the steering arm cannot be accessed with the assemble on. It looks like this kit will not fit the early Nova with rear steer. Any suggestions will be more than welcome.
 

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I guess the obvious thing to do would be to call the manufacturer.
Is it a slight interference?.... will grinding a small amount of material away help without comprimising the strength of the part.
Their website says 64-74 nova so you'd think they would have confirmed the fit.
Maybe you could shoot us some pics; might help someone else out later.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Shawn you were exactly right. I called Aerospace and the Tech dude straightened me right out. With rear steer the calipers mount on the front side of the spindle. With front steer the calipers go to the rear. I took for granted that they all went to the rear, as that was all that I had ever seen. Got one side mounted, after getting tech advice, it was a lot easier. Still a bear to get rotor perfectly centered, even with the shims. First side took 3 days of head scratching. Estimate second side will take a couple or three hours.
Once again nicely built stuff. I've learned alot.
 

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1bad2 said:
Shawn you were exactly right. I called Aerospace and the Tech dude straightened me right out.

It amazes me that manufacturers don't put more effort into their instructions. A few bucks spent here would eliminate alot of phone calls, unhappy customers and maybe fewer tech guys on the payroll.
 
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