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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if this is in the wrong thread, I am new to this site and this is my first post.

When I was around 12/13, my dad bought a 1968 Chevy nova for "$300" for the both of us to restore together. I knew nothing (still know nothing) abt cars but he was gonna take this car as a teaching step and to spend time with me, eventually giving it to me once it was fully restored. He didn't get to, he passed away from leukemia in 2015, we never got to work one bit on the car. Not to get into details but the only thing I really kept from my fathers possessions was the car.
It pretty much sat in a garage rusting and not getting any better all thru high school up until now. Now that im 20 yrs old, I want to do something with it. whether it be restoring it or putting it for sale and using the money to put to a running nova.

This site/forum seemed the best fit to ask, I see everyone's beautiful cars and how much they talk abt them, its great.

I guess my question to anyone who reads this would be, do you think it'd be worth restoring considering the time and money it will take or should i sale it and what would be the best way to go about that (needing to get it appraised, where to list it, how much it would go for) ?

thank you to anyone who took time to read this and answer, it means so much to me. I hope yalls days have been good. thank you again.
- Michael, 20, Tx
 

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'67 4 door, 65 wagon. WISCONSIN
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Post up some pictures of the car. It would help anyone here, with more than a clue than me, how much work it would take a novice to get it back running etc.

Also, be aware, I believe there are quite a few one-year only parts for 1968, so that would increase the cost if you are missing any of them.
 

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Michael, welcome to SNS! Echoing @exotec and @Exlimey , pictures would be ever so helpful. Being sentimental myself to a point, I too would keep the car, store it and/or tinker while learning then never part with it. As mentioned, the '68 is a bit of a unicorn in locating certain parts. Depending on its current state of disrepair or completion, it may take some time to acquire everything you need. Hang here and ask lots of questions and we'll do our best to answer, never judging, always mindful. My condolences on your father's passing. The car is something he left you... That legacy could turn into something beautiful too.

Again, welcome.

~Andy
 

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Sorry for your loss. Your Father wanted to work with you, and give it to you when finished. Since he only made the purchase, with good intentions, he was not really connected to it. Would he really want you to spend a lot of your time and money on this? I would have to assume that he would prefer that you get something that you can enjoy. On the replacement car you could have a special plaque, or pin stripping, done making a tribute to him. Have fun.
 

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I am building a 68 and there certainly are some parts which are harder to come by, but nothing has really stopped me so far. However, I am also just fine cutting out an old part and upgrading it. Im not sticking to any 68 originality. Remember its a 53 year old car, and everything is stuck or busted. We call ours Hydra, because every time one problem is fixed two more show up. Its just how it goes. That being said, its also very rewarding. I always encourage people to dig in to projects, but with some realism.
 

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If this car is in poor condition, sell it off. Trying to restore a 50 year old car when your knowledge of anything automotive is nill , will be a nearly impossible task. Taking it to a restoration shop is very very expensive, if it ever gets completed. Did you ever think if this was an easy project your Dad may have been more prone to start on it? Are you willing to put in 10 years of your free time and all your money into this project? If so great , but Craigslist is full of projects that have been given up on. The easiest part is acquiring a project car, the difficult part is the time and effort one has to put forth to make something out of it.,.... Well that and the funds.
 

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Welcome to the site! Very sorry for your loss.

Congrats on taking the 1st step! Restoring a car is no small project. It takes a lot of work and $. You need motivation, tools, parts, time and a place to work on it. Otherwise, you need a-lot of money to pay a shop to do it. It’s not terribly difficult, or strenuous really. A well thought out plan for the car, if you decide to take it on, is the next step. Let us know what your up against, what shape the car is in, and you will get lots of input from members. Is it a complete car with a full driveline? Where is the rust and how bad is it? How is the interior? If you know or remember, what was your Dad’s plan for the car?
 

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Welcome Michael. As has been said, sorry in the loss of your dad. It's understandable your wanting to carry on the project that he envisioned.

Restoration of vintage cars can be very fulfilling But, requires significant time, money, skills, tools and a large place to do the work. It's takes quite the commitment. Know up front, money invested with very rarely be recovered. Not trying to sway your decision, but these are the bare facts.

Being 20 years of age, you have many things to consider. Career and life, both require focus and time.

Post some pictures and members will give you their honest opinion based on what they can see and then you can make a more informed decision. Think it through and good luck.
 

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I have yet to see a 2 day old baby that could rebuild a Chevy 6 banger. Just takes time and a few tools to work on one.
I'd would keep it if possible. We all had to learn as we went. First, I would crawl under it and check out the trunk and floor
boards for rust. See if you have a Flintstone car first.
Dave
Wichita, Ks
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Sorry if this is in the wrong thread, I am new to this site and this is my first post.

When I was around 12/13, my dad bought a 1968 Chevy nova for "$300" for the both of us to restore together. I knew nothing (still know nothing) abt cars but he was gonna take this car as a teaching step and to spend time with me, eventually giving it to me once it was fully restored. He didn't get to, he passed away from leukemia in 2015, we never got to work one bit on the car. Not to get into details but the only thing I really kept from my fathers possessions was the car.
It pretty much sat in a garage rusting and not getting any better all thru high school up until now. Now that im 20 yrs old, I want to do something with it. whether it be restoring it or putting it for sale and using the money to put to a running nova.

This site/forum seemed the best fit to ask, I see everyone's beautiful cars and how much they talk abt them, its great.

I guess my question to anyone who reads this would be, do you think it'd be worth restoring considering the time and money it will take or should i sale it and what would be the best way to go about that (needing to get it appraised, where to list it, how much it would go for) ?

thank you to anyone who took time to read this and answer, it means so much to me. I hope yalls days have been good. thank you again.
- Michael, 20, Tx
thank you so much for the replies! it means a lot and im taking everything said into consideration, im sure i will receive better advice when i post some pics of the car for yall to see. The next time im able to go to my storage and see it, i will def post pics so everyone can see! To explain it without pics til then, id say its condition from 1-10 (1 being the worst, 10 being the best) its prob a 1 or 2. its rain rusted, wheels are flat, and im not sure anything abt engines and internals but the car does not start! Now the interior is pretty kept up well, i believe the lining on the roof (the fabric) is peeling but other than that id say the interior has kept up well. i did see someone mention if there was any holes on the bottom of the car, called it a "flintstone" i believe there is one, not very big though.

thank you again to everyone who has replied and future thanks to those who will reply later! Yall have a great community set up and all are immensely helpful and welcoming. i thank you for the condolences as well.

michael, 20,Tx
 

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I think if you sell the car you'll regret it.Chances are you'll probably not buy another one. Just because loss of interest, life, job etc, but if you keep the car at lease you'll have it. I mean it's not costing you anything to keep it. You may not work on it today tomorrow or even a year from now but you know it's there whenever you're ready to. Remember restoring a car is a marathon. Not a race.
 

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I'm 57 and have been wrenching about 50 years. Started holding a light for my dad and went from there. Your dad bought this car as a "bonding thing" with you but you never got started on the project.

I know this won't be a popular opinion here, but if you don't have the basic skills and a place to do a restoration, move on from this. It's going to get very expensive and you will most likely get fed up or lose interest.
 

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I'm 57 and have been wrenching about 50 years. Started holding a light for my dad and went from there. Your dad bought this car as a "bonding thing" with you but you never got started on the project.

I know this won't be a popular opinion here, but if you don't have the basic skills and a place to do a restoration, move on from this. It's going to get very expensive and you will most likely get fed up or lose interest.
I can see the merit in this response.
 

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I agree with a couple of the comments above i have restored MANY cars and its a large commitment from a time standpoint to a financial stand point my wife says i am crazy when i work on my car projects because that's what it takes to finish a full restoration Total Dedication and lots of money, FYI i think if you don't have the skills or money Pass the project on to the next owner and buy something that needs less effort.
 
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