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Hello all,
a Nova newbie here, I first wanted to say thank you all for always helping a lost brother like myself on my never-ending journey of trying to get my nova running. I am planning on installing an AC Delete Cover (From Classic Industries #14442) in my 1973 Nova Custom (has factory air in it). It's ugly and isn't functioning and would love to remove it. My question is i found these instructions online for how to do the install/swap;


Is this all there really is to it? or are they any more modifications that need to be done?

(Here is also a screenshot of the set up if it helps for reference)
 

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You might have to trim some edges and drill/ream some holes, but it really is that easy. You're time ahead with the engine out and fender off.

I used the plastic version of that cover (because I heard it fit better than the fiberglass), and I had to make modifications to some holes as well. I also had to clock the blower fan a little different because the holes for the screws were too big. You will most likely have to cut holes for the fan resistor and the temp sensor (I think that's what it was). Keep the resistor in an open area with lots of air flow.
 

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I hate to see it go, so I'll offer this thread if you have any thoughts to keep it and get it functioning again: Factory AC Explained. These old AC setups can work really well. Of course you shouldn't have much trouble selling the unit if you proceed to take it out. Whatever you do, don't throw it in the trash because they are only becoming more scarce.

If you go with the delete box, you will want to retain the fan resisters and the high speed fan relay, but you do not need to keep the ambient temperature switch (located on the side of the box just under the POA valve. That switch ran inline with the AC compressor and just kept the system from running when it's very cold outside. It will serve no function with your heater-only system. I would keep the heater vacuum valve installed and leave all the dash controls and duct flaps as-is.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You might have to trim some edges and drill/ream some holes, but it really is that easy. You're time ahead with the engine out and fender off.

I used the plastic version of that cover (because I heard it fit better than the fiberglass), and I had to make modifications to some holes as well. I also had to clock the blower fan a little different because the holes for the screws were too big. You will most likely have to cut holes for the fan resistor and the temp sensor (I think that's what it was). Keep the resistor in an open area with lots of air flow.
Sudden_Impulse thank you very kindly for your thoughts, all that doesn't sound bad at all. I will keep those in mind as I do the install!
 

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I hate to see it go, so I'll offer this thread if you have any thoughts to keep it and get it functioning again: Factory AC Explained. These old AC setups can work really well. Of course you shouldn't have much trouble selling the unit if you proceed to take it out. Whatever you do, don't throw it in the trash because they are only becoming more scarce.

If you go with the delete box, you will want to retain the fan resisters and the high speed fan relay, but you do not need to keep the ambient temperature switch (located on the side of the box just under the POA valve. That switch ran inline with the AC compressor and just kept the system from running when it's very cold outside. It will serve no function with your heater-only system. I would keep the heater vacuum valve installed and leave all the dash controls and duct flaps as-is.
TheBandit, first off thank you for taking time to chime in & secondly, funny that you commented on my post because I literally watched your "Factory AC Explained" video just last night! I stumbled on to it in my final effort to determine how doable reviving the factory air and converting over to R134 would be and the costs of doing so. But. Wow, my hat off to your sir, to say that you know your stuff is putting it mildly. Well done on the video. Unfortunately time and finances don't permit me to take the route you took. The route with this 73 is going to be way less glorious. But i have a 74 shell as well that I may try and take on with that set up (eventually hah). The 74's body is in great shape and i welded new floor pans and the front clip has been refinished so i plan in the future to make that one a show quality type of build. But for now is on hold.

Off your recommendation I plan on keeping the unit and any components I have to remove as you suggested. And also plan on leaving the dash controls and ducts flaps as is as well in case I want to revisit an ac set up again. Again thanks for chiming in.
 

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Thank you for the kind words. I accumulated that understanding of the AC system after many years of on-and-off research plus connecting the dots with what I learned while earning my mechanical engineering degree. It was really exciting to get the system working after nearly 20 years of it hanging uselessly off the firewall and I've been enjoying it for a couple years now.

Finances are an understandably limiting factor. Depending on where you live AC may not be all that important. I know I managed without it for decades like many people. Is your other car an AC car? I can't imagine retrofitting to a non-AC car since the firewall and the ducting setup is different, but I know some people have don eit.
 

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You might find some helpful info in this thread.

 

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Thank you for the kind words. I accumulated that understanding of the AC system after many years of on-and-off research plus connecting the dots with what I learned while earning my mechanical engineering degree. It was really exciting to get the system working after nearly 20 years of it hanging uselessly off the firewall and I've been enjoying it for a couple years now.

Finances are an understandably limiting factor. Depending on where you live AC may not be all that important. I know I managed without it for decades like many people. Is your other car an AC car? I can't imagine retrofitting to a non-AC car since the firewall and the ducting setup is different, but I know some people have don eit.
Ah, I see, well that education has paid off! Well unfortunately I live in Florida... so AC is something always desired hah. But for this build i've come to accept not having it. And i'm not quite sure actually if the 74 was an AC car, would you be able to tell from a photo of the bare firewall? I could attach a pic.
 

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You might find some helpful info in this thread.

Kimrobertson, that thread will be very useful, I took a glance through it and will be for sure referencing it as i do the install. Thank you kindly!
 

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Ah, I see, well that education has paid off! Well unfortunately I live in Florida... so AC is something always desired hah. But for this build i've come to accept not having it. And i'm not quite sure actually if the 74 was an AC car, would you be able to tell from a photo of the bare firewall? I could attach a pic.
Yes the AC cars have an AC specific firewall with a vertical rectangular opening for incoming air from the evaporator. Non AC cars have a horizontal rectangular opening to feed just the heater core. Also AC cars have the duct vacuum actuator under the cowl on the passenger side, another vacuum-operated duct at the passenger kick panel, and center dash vents.

If you think you may want to get the system running down the road you can leave everything on the firewall and you will still have vent, heater and defrost functionally. Mine was hanging on the firewall like that for almost two decades before I got the AC functions working.
 

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Hello all,
a Nova newbie here, I first wanted to say thank you all for always helping a lost brother like myself on my never-ending journey of trying to get my nova running. I am planning on installing an AC Delete Cover (From Classic Industries #14442) in my 1973 Nova Custom (has factory air in it). It's ugly and isn't functioning and would love to remove it. My question is i found these instructions online for how to do the install/swap;


Is this all there really is to it? or are they any more modifications that need to be done?

(Here is also a screenshot of the set up if it helps for reference)
It's very easy just did my 74 with AC what I suggest is dont twist ur lines off of heater core. Cut with razor so they dont get damaged. The wheel well comes out easy. Take ur time. It took me about 2 hrs
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes the AC cars have an AC specific firewall with a vertical rectangular opening for incoming air from the evaporator. Non AC cars have a horizontal rectangular opening to feed just the heater core. Also AC cars have the duct vacuum actuator under the cowl on the passenger side, another vacuum-operated duct at the passenger kick panel, and center dash vents.

If you think you may want to get the system running down the road you can leave everything on the firewall and you will still have vent, heater and defrost functionally. Mine was hanging on the firewall like that for almost two decades before I got the AC functions working.
Ah i see! well then i believe the 74 was in fact an AC car then. It's got the vertical opening for incoming air as you referred to vs. the horizontal opening. It just looks like it's been plated over (from the cabin side). Here's a pic of the 74 not the best one (sorry it's the only one i had on file at the moment).

IMG_2465.jpg


And yeah i thought about it leaving it all, I've already removed the dryer receiver and the condenser from the core support. There's a line that leads from expansion valve to the dryer receiver that's still dangling. Would it be possible to remove that line and just to cap it at the expansion valve and just run that way or would there be any other modifications necessary to leave the set up in place "hanging on the firewall" as you mentioned. Also there's some punctures in the evap box which i'm sure wouldn't be a good thing to drive around with those holes in it.
 

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It's very easy just did my 74 with AC what I suggest is dont twist ur lines off of heater core. Cut with razor so they dont get damaged. The wheel well comes out easy. Take ur time. It took me about 2 hrs
Awesome that is encouraging news! Got any pics? Also when you refer to cutting with a razor do you mean cutting the hose all the way through just after fitting from the heater core (i.e. shortening the heater hoses?). Hopefully that made sense hah!
 

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Yes your firewall is definitely an original AC firewall. I'm embarrassed to admit, but on mine I just wrapped the old TXV inlet and POA outlet with duct tape. I replaced it a couple times in the 20 years it was like that. When I finally got the system going I flushed it really well and replaced the TXV.

For the punctures in the evaporator box, you can purchase a fiberglass repair kit and patch those pretty easily.
 

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Yes your firewall is definitely an original AC firewall. I'm embarrassed to admit, but on mine I just wrapped the old TXV inlet and POA outlet with duct tape. I replaced it a couple times in the 20 years it was like that. When I finally got the system going I flushed it really well and replaced the TXV.

For the punctures in the evaporator box, you can purchase a fiberglass repair kit and patch those pretty easily.
So just for clarification then, I would be able to just cap the line at the expansion valve and be able to run the engine normally? There doesn't appear to be any open lines from the POA valve that need to be capped. (And then of course seal up the holes in the evap box).
 

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I would cap the two locations circled in red. The top one is the back of the POA valve which is where the compressor suction line normally connects. The bottom is the inlet to the TXV. This will keep stuff out of the POA valve and evaporator until you are eventually ready to tackle it. The engine will not be affected at all. If you keep the compressor mounted to the engine, disconnect the compressor clutch wire to prevent it from turning on.

406763
 

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I would cap the two locations circled in red. The top one is the back of the POA valve which is where the compressor suction line normally connects. The bottom is the inlet to the TXV. This will keep stuff out of the POA valve and evaporator until you are eventually ready to tackle it. The engine will not be affected at all. If you keep the compressor mounted to the engine, disconnect the compressor clutch wire to prevent it from turning on.

View attachment 406763
Right on. good news back of POA valve appears to be capped already
20200707_160352.jpg

and then for the inlet to the TXV, can i put a torch on this? it's wanting to just bend and theres not a place to put a wrench on the other end to stabilize it to break it.

20200707_160415.jpg
 
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