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1972 Nova - 4 door - straight 6
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up a '72. There are a few spots in the floor and since i don't have a mig/tig and i don't need to replace the entire floorboard, would braze welding some tin metal work?
 

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It could however, brazing is a function of capilary action of dissimilar metals somewhat like gluing metal together where welding joins two similar metals into one by adding metal as a molten pool and creating a molten/fluid puddle on each side of the added metal combining the three so, brazing is not the preferred metal for anything structural however, it truly depends on where and what you plan on brazing
 

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1972 Nova - 4 door - straight 6
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would be brazing a few holes in the floorboard, none are big enough to put your hand through. Would something like 3m panel bond be better? I’m trying to avoid buying a full welding setup for such small projects.
I’d clean up the metal before patching etc…
 

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I would be brazing a few holes in the floorboard, none are big enough to put your hand through. Would something like 3m panel bond be better? I’m trying to avoid buying a full welding setup for such small projects.
I’d clean up the metal before patching etc…
You could totally braze that up, just get the pan down to clean, bright metal and clean every inch with acetone before heating. Let it air dry for a while and vent out the car before striking a flame though.
 

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Just buy some regular welding wire ( mig wire or tig rod) And weld them in. Coat hangers ARE NOT like they use to be So don't go that route. If you were close I'd say bring it over.
 

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You can braze it at a lower temp with a carbuerizing flame. No capillary action, build a bead at lower temp.
I brazed many floorboards years ago. I have steel wrecker tow dollies that my grandfather brazed together in 1957. Manage the heat affect to surrounding areas and it will work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks. I was hoping i can braze or use 3m patch panel.What gauge of metal should i use to cover the holes, 18ga? About 30 years ago i did a lot of braze welding but nothing on a car (and nothing that was crucial). I tried MIG but i can't remember why i didn't get the hang of it. If i remember correctly i was horrible at it. I think buying a MIG (I live out in the middle of nowhere, no one is going to rent anything) might be over kill but i haven't totally assessed the entire car. I have worked on old cars in the past (last one was a 62 ghia, before that a 69 F250, 80 chevy short wide and others) but i haven't ever had to weld anything.
 

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Just gonna put this right here for anyone interested...


"Technologically, a nonwetting liquid is highly unfavorable with regard to the formation of an intimate interface, due to its lack of capability of penetration of surface and grain-boundary irregularities because of the lack of capillary behavior. Also, the liquid does not distribute itself uniformly" Meaning, it is not strong at all... Speak not of which you know not... :cool:
 

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1973 Custom hatchback
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My experience with our floors is that the rust you see is only the beginning and as you add heat to the old metal it will burn off, making the hole bigger. As you attempt to weld or braze the newer thicker patch into the older less stable and probably thinner metal you inevitably blow more holes... repeat. also the flame of the torch blows holes quite nicely on its own, espescally in the old metal.
Having uh, acquired a stop sign or two at midnight auto ( in 1980) and successfully brazed it in my 64 falcon DS floor, using rod and flux, it can be done. AIR we heated the rod and stuck it in the flux or sprinkled the flux on it then heated the metal until well, really %&*^*ing hot and then drove the rod in as fast s it would melt it. There may have ben underage drinking involved. It did not look real pretty but hey its a floor and no one saw it again. Man those were the days... we we were 14-17 years old, in our friends dads shop. His dad even let his sons have the wrecker/ tow truck, cause he didn't want to be woke up when we inevitably ran into a ditch or something.
thanks for the memories!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
After pulling back some more carpet, there is more rust then i first saw (picked up a shop light today and that helped) Lots of surface rust and small areas are rusted through. If i follow through with my plan to try braze welding, what gauge metal should i use?. I am starting to look towards getting a gasless MIG setup (i notice they are a lot cheaper then when i was looking many years ago).
 

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After pulling back some more carpet, there is more rust then i first saw (picked up a shop light today and that helped) Lots of surface rust and small areas are rusted through. If i follow through with my plan to try braze welding, what gauge metal should i use?. I am starting to look towards getting a gasless MIG setup (i notice they are a lot cheaper then when i was looking many years ago).
18ga is find but if you're trying to reinforce the floors, 16ga is prolly better. 18ga would hold up fine though, just make sure you don't just weld a plate over the old rusted portions or there will be far more damage due to trapped moisture and debris between the old and new metal, causing early failure to the new from the old and the moisture/filth trapped in the interstitial space. The little flux core migs from Harbor Freight work pretty well for what you're doing, just get the areas down to clean, bright metal the best you can and watch a lot of YT videos, then experiment with some scrap 16 or 18ga and try your hand at it. Pretty easy, really. Oh, make absolutely certain you get flux-core wire too.. LOL... Go slow, small stitch welds far apart... short bursts with penetration... no warping...


 

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Awesome videos, but man that’s kinda advanced for me. Never did anything at that scale.
It's really pretty simple, just practice on some scrap first. Anything gotta be better than rusty holes in thinned metal... Again, look up some videos on stitch welding sheetmetal. You'll be fine.

YOU CAN DOOOO IIITTTTT!!!!
 
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