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I've been sitting on my roof sag issue for a couple years now. Finally thinking about fixing it. Anyone with advice?

It's got serious oil canning all across. It looks like someone stored bails of hay on top of this hardtop for a couple decades.

No rust, no issues...
Just can't install a headliner till this gets fixed - which makes whole car a hobo-car. I want to begin hammer and dolly-ing it out, or better yet learn along with someone who knows how.
But when that gets done I want supports welded in place for real strength so it's never an issue again. Can I weld the existing supports on the inside up to the top of the sheet metal? Or should I get extra braces welded in place on the inside? What's the process/solution here?

Don't think I have any photos of it, but here's the car on my Instagram: 66jova

Thanks.
-Joe
 

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Depending on how bad of shape it's in you might consider replacing the whole top. Call Real Deal Steel in Sanford Florida. They are building complete bodies for 66 or 67 Nova and I'm sure they would sell you a new roof.
 

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72, 2 Dr, 383, 700r4
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My '72 had the same problem, looked like some kids walked on top of it while it was sitting in a field. I only fixed mine about 3 months ago. It oil canned in the center and there were visible raised creases around the edges of the roof caused by the roof being pushed down in the center.

Take a sharpie and draw a line along the top of all the creases so you can easily see them. I have a small floor jack that I put inside the car with a 2x4 going vertical to apply a slight upward pressure to the inside of the roof. My interior was gutted so it was no problem. Make sure and put some good padding on the end of the 2x4 that is making contact with the roof as not to cause more damage. Pick a section of the roof and apply very slight pressure with the jack between the crease and the center of the roof. I basically did it in quadrants. Then from the top use a body hammer and start tapping the creases down. You will start seeing the creases disappear and the center of your roof will start becoming firmer.

After tapping all the creases down the center of the roof was solid and all oil canning was gone. Thought I had pics but I cant find them. I hope I wrote this so that it makes sense.
 

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Then from the top use a body hammer and start tapping the creases down. You will start seeing the creases disappear and the center of your roof will start becoming firmer.
Great advice. Sometimes this works so well that no filler is required. Don't get carried away with the hammer.
 

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72, 2 Dr, 383, 700r4
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Great advice. Sometimes this works so well that no filler is required. Don't get carried away with the hammer.
Agreed, I had one spot where I did not stay flat with the hammer that required minimal filler. If you go at it slowly you will not need any filler.
 

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My '72 (that we just started restoring) had the same problem up until a week ago. You could see the footprints from where someone jumped on the roof.
We cut the bracing out from under the roof panel and bent it back into the shape the way it should have been originally, but added more curve to it to help push the roof back up when re-installed. We also did some slight hammer and dolly work on the creases. When it was put back in and welded, it was good as new, maybe a bit better because it seemed to have a bit more rigidity. We also used some dabs of panel adhesive to make sure there wouldn't be any rattling between the bracing and the roof itself. Hope this helps. Cheers
 

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72, 2 Dr, 383, 700r4
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My '72 (that we just started restoring) had the same problem up until a week ago. You could see the footprints from where someone jumped on the roof.
We cut the bracing out from under the roof panel and bent it back into the shape the way it should have been originally, but added more curve to it to help push the roof back up when re-installed. We also did some slight hammer and dolly work on the creases. When it was put back in and welded, it was good as new, maybe a bit better because it seemed to have a bit more rigidity. We also used some dabs of panel adhesive to make sure there wouldn't be any rattling between the bracing and the roof itself. Hope this helps. Cheers
Great idea cutting the bracing out. I may just do that since my bracing still looks a little tweaked.
 
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