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Discussion Starter #1
I put the new inner tie rod ends on the 63 this weekend, and found out my outers are shot. My question is, right now I have the curved outer tie rod ends, I purchased the inners from summit racing and they have curved and straight outers listed for my car. The straight ones are much cheaper than the curved. Can I use the straight or do I need to stay with the curved? When I put everything back together I eyeballed everything straight for a temp allignment, but when I backed the car out of the driveway the wheels shifted and are now canted in at the tops and toed in. After some searching on the sight I am under the impression that I need to set the caster and camper first, roll it back and forth, then set the toe. Any insight or tips?
 

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Per the Rock Auto on-line catalog, you need Moog #ES675. These are priced at $41.79 ea (way lower than the S company)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the heads up on the part number and price. Any insight on the straight vs curved outer tie rod ends? Just curious if Summit has the application listing wrong, as they show straight and curved design for my car. I will stay with the curved ones that are already on there, just wondering...
 

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One of the easiest ways to align the car yourself so you can take it to the shop is when your suspension is all installed and your car is jacked up both of your wheels will be pointing in ward toward your radiator quite a bit. Then when you lower your car to the ground it will straighten out.

I never have bought stuff specifically for my nova off summit or jegs always, chevy 2 only or modern performance classics.

But if you have to much camber, wheels pointing in at the top of your wheel when the car is on the ground adjust your lower control arm eccentric nut, probably inward to pull the bottom wheel in. Then the tie rod will adjust caster, wheels pointing in our out when all the way on the ground.

To repeat when your car is jacked up for correct wheel alignment both tires will look like they are pointing in toward the radiator, then when you lower the car your wheels will straighten out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
One of the easiest ways to align the car yourself so you can take it to the shop is when your suspension is all installed and your car is jacked up both of your wheels will be pointing in ward toward your radiator quite a bit. Then when you lower your car to the ground it will straighten out.

I never have bought stuff specifically for my nova off summit or jegs always, chevy 2 only or modern performance classics.

But if you have to much camber, wheels pointing in at the top of your wheel when the car is on the ground adjust your lower control arm eccentric nut, probably inward to pull the bottom wheel in. Then the tie rod will adjust caster, wheels pointing in our out when all the way on the ground.

To repeat when your car is jacked up for correct wheel alignment both tires will look like they are pointing in toward the radiator, then when you lower the car your wheels will straighten out.
Problem is before I did the idler arm bearing conversion my allignment was out of wack (tearing up the inside edge of tires to where belts were showing after only less than 100 miles). So after I did the idler arm conversion it drove good on test drive, no crazy wandering all over the road. Was getting ready to take it for an allignment the next day and took it for another test drive to the end of the street and felt something "give" in the steering. Then with the driver side tire pointed straight, the passenger side tire was toed way out (like an inch and a half). Did the inner tie rods and messed with the A arm eccentrics and got things eyeballed straight. When I backed out of the driveway I felt it give again, and now the tires are kicked out at the top and toed in. Going to do the outer tie rods and then go from there. Just want to get it close so I can get it to the allignment shop. Only one place I found near me that will even attemp the allignment on this car. Everybody else says it isn't in the computer (even tho I have the specs) or my car sits too low for them to touch. I have heard every excuse...
 

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Did you replace your ball joints?

Take your time, doing the alignment yourself is a pain. Trial and error, jack up the car, adjust the car, lower the car, drive the car, jack up the car, adjust the car, lower the car, adjust the car.

It is almost impossible to do it correctly in one shot, but the advice I gave you with both wheels pointing toward the radiator should help a bunch. And make sure everything is tight.

And this is also why people put after market lower control arms because on the 1st gen nova's hit a pot hole, or something, drive out of your drive way to fast and your alignment is out of whack. Lots of people say this.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Did you replace your ball joints?
I replaced the ball joints when I did the disc brake conversion a couple years ago...car hasn't been driven much since then...Under 500 miles probably. Outer tie rods are pretty bad, thats on my next to do list. And after the holidays I hope to do the lower A arm conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Your car is a 63 right? I believe you should have the curved outer tie rods. Tie rods for the 62 are straight.

http://www.classicperform.com/Store2/Tie-Rod-Ends.htm

http://www.classicperform.com/Store/1962_67_Chevy_Nova/ES675.htm
63 with front end componants from a 64 for the 5 lug conversion and rear end from 67, then did the CPP front disc conversion with 2" lowering springs (may go back to stock springs). Summit has the straight outer tie rods listed for 63-67.
 

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This is what I do for alignment on my 63 since our Nova's are such a pain and as you know the alignment changes so much from on the ground to in the air. I use the lock out conversion for the lowers or better yet the octogon shaped ones from CPP. I set camber first at 0-1 degree with a wheel hub gauge but you can measure it with a square on good flat concrete to get as close to 0 as possible. I always eyeball the tie rods to be as close as they were originally but after the camber is set drive for a couple blocks to let everything settle. Sometimes you can jump on the bumper and then roll the car back and forth but the best is to drive and make some quick right and left turns. Then when you drive your nova into the garage park on two pieces of cardboard so the tires can slide easily on the smooth concrete. Use a tape measure and a couple of yardsticks and measure your toe then set to your spec while the car is on the ground. It's a pain but it can be done and with the cardboard acting as a bearing its a lot easier. Usually now I check caster and double check camber and adjust the lower eccentrics again, then check toe one more time. Most of the time I'm lucky and when the camber is set well the caster is close. I do however run a lot of caster in my car and it took a while to mess with it to get it there. The negative is at low speed its more difficult to turn but the self centering feature is better at higher speeds.
 
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