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I'm putting together a 350 for the gasser. I was given a two bolt 1969 350 block, .030 over bore and ready to go. I have a good stock crank and am going to use flat top pistons with a compression height of 1.540" 5140 rods with cap screws, basically a stock bottom end. For the heads I'll reuse the Trick flow heads off of my 327, they flow mid 220 CFM on the intake and 184 on the exhaust. Speaking with a local cam grinder we decided on a cam with a ad. dur 282/282 224/[email protected] and 465/465 (1.5 ratio) lift and 110 LSA, ground 2*advanced. I know that these heads will take more lift and duration but I'm concerned with the two bolt bottom end do not want to grenade the bottom end, I know this engine is not going to be over 350 HP and 375Ftlbs, but this should make a fine street/strip motor right??? Any major changes???
 

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X2^^^^^ a two bolt will handle much more than that. I had a two bolt with 11.5-1 a comp solid cam with [email protected] and .560 lift on a 150 hp n2o kit and never had a problem. I studed the bottom end is all i did. I built that motor 8 years ago and it is still runing today. :d
 

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X2^^^^^ a two bolt will handle much more than that. I had a two bolt with 11.5-1 a comp solid cam with [email protected] and .560 lift on a 150 hp n2o kit and never had a problem. I studed the bottom end is all i did. I built that motor 8 years ago and it is still runing today. :d
I agree, stud it and let it eat!:yes:
 

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Because the cast iron caps are relatively flexible, using high tensile studs or bolts sometimes distort the cap when torqued to recommended value. It's always a good idea when substituting fasteners to check the main cap ID for dimensionality and out of roundness while torqued. The machinist should check this but may not if you don't specifically ask (and pay for it). Every operation takes time and time is money to the machinist.

If you are just building a 350hp 400 ft/lb engine then it may not be required to go to great lengths machining the block, unless the block you have needs it.

For example, I wouldn't go to the expense of installing splayed caps on a 350 hp street engine.

It also may be cheaper to find a good 4 bolt truck block then tricking out /repairing your 2 bolt block.

In any event, you'll save money by starting with a good block rather than throwing money at one that has core shift, was damaged or abused at some point in it's life.

Unless you have all the measuring tools and experience, you'll first need to find a great machinist, which unfortunately is getting harder to do these days. Look for somebody with similar knowledge and equipment as Jeff (aka Stock Z/28) or CNC Blocks rather than the typical greasy engine repair job shops found in most towns.
You'll be happier spending a little more for good work than getting bargain you always regret.
 
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