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Discussion Starter #81
Vacation was great. Had a fabulous weekend. But I am excited to get back to work. So last night the wife and I put the Nova back up on jack stands so that today I can connect the brake lines and install the front calipers.

I also got the window felt I ordered, but I am pretty sure it is the wrong thing. The site said 74-79, which seemed odd to me, but I went with it and even asked customer service if this was right. What I got was of course a gen 4 kit. So I emailed them on Friday and I am waiting for a response. I did find a 73-74 kit at Steele so I might just order that. Their weatherstripping kit seemed really good.
 

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Discussion Starter #82
So I intended to get the brake install started on Monday, but a cop thought it would be a good idea to hit my wife while she was walking across the road so I had to take care of her. She is okay. Somehow even though she was thrown and run over nothing is broken and she is not even that sore. No the cop was not responding to an emergency. He was just making a left turn and wasn't paying attention.

So yesterday I started working on finishing up the brakes. I got the lines installed to the prop valve. I also go the front calipers installed and the flex lines in. Tonight I am hoping I can install the brackets to hold the line in place and connect the hose and lines. I do need to open the original hole on the hanger for the hose to line transition in the rear. It is like a mm too small.

Does anyone have any pictures of the routing of their brake lines? I was stupid and did not take pictures. I cannot find anything online.
 

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Ray McAvoy posted this back in Feb 2016 in our Drivetrain and Performance section here on SNS:

"If you download the 68 - 79 Nova parts catalog (it's a PDF file) from Classic Muscle, you'll find a few diagrams inside. In particular, look on page 58 for a brake line diagram. It's not the best, but it's about the only one I've seen.

The factory assembly manuals might have some better diagrams. As far as I know, they haven't been published for 73 & newer but the brake lines didn't change much (if any) from 72."

Hope it helps!
Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #85
My dad came over to help me get my thoughts in order and I am glad he did. We made a plan:
I am going to sand down the quarter panels to bare metal to see what I am working with. I will then figure out what to do. I will then go around and fix the rust spots I can see currently. Then I will finish sanding down the rest of the car to bare metal. Then I will prime and shape the car.

We also welded this weekend. First time ever for me. He helped me lay a beautiful and strong stack of dimes :) I am still struggling with the sheet metal and blowing through, but I think I need to turn my heat up just a little and keep practicing getting in and out.

Tonight I am hoping to finish up setting up the brake lines. Now that I have my new drill bit to make the bigger hole so I should just be able to hook everything up. I might have to make a few bends to get it to fit, but we will see how much tweaking is needed.

I will post some pics of my welds tomorrow I forgot to get some. I also need to get some pics of the car.


He also helped me get my motivation back. So progress should be moving a lot better now.
 

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Glad to see you got your head back In the game. I went to a vocational high school and in the body shop there was a banner that said “nobody will ever remember how fast you did it, they will remember how well you did it”. Keep up the good work, you’ll get there. If there’s one thing I wish I did first was get all the bulk of the body work done before I built the car, i think you and your dad came up with a solid plan.
 

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When Bruce (son) and I put prefab brake lines on my 68, the line extended from front to read, in one piece.

It was so long that we could not wiggle it from under the car up into the engine bay.

We had to put a splice in it, about half length.

That was about 9 years ago and it is doing fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
So yesterday the body work started. I began with 80 grit paper on my orbital sander. That took the paint off, but then I ran into some body filler *queue dramatic music*. My heart kind of sank because (no offence) but I have seen some of the other project cars on this site with that much body filler. So I switched to 60 grit, and that did not do much. So I did what any idiot would do and started using an 80 grit flap disc. It worked. I would move on from a spot at the first sign of sparks. I did not notice all the dust it created. I went to show my wife my progress and noticed that it looks like Scarface sneezed in my garage. You could clearly see my foot prints in the stuff. So I stopped for the night ordered some 40 grit for my orbital sander (since I can hook up the shop vac to it) and we began to clean up the mess. I set up a box fan at the back of the garage and used the shop fan to blow the stuff out and towards the fan, which would blow it out of the open door. It took a while to clean it all up. But I must say that the body looks pretty good. I could not notice any crazy high or low spots.

So the plan is to remove the trim on the driver side and then tomorrow start sanding again. I also need to order some After blast so I can protect the panels.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
Brake lines

So the front one are pretty close to going in the original hole, but I am not sure if I should cut and reflare them or if I can bend them to the correct position. The back ones seem to go in just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #90
my welding progress

I think I have the thicker stuff down, but I still need practice on the sheet metal stuff. Towards the end I was doing better on the sheet metal, but still blowing holes. I found out that I needed to turn my gas pressure up just a bit and my heat up just a bit. So I am going to try that and see how it goes. I also was trying to bridge too big of a gap at first. I learned the smaller the gap the easier it is.
 

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I think I have the thicker stuff down, but I still need practice on the sheet metal stuff. Towards the end I was doing better on the sheet metal, but still blowing holes. I found out that I needed to turn my gas pressure up just a bit and my heat up just a bit. So I am going to try that and see how it goes. I also was trying to bridge too big of a gap at first. I learned the smaller the gap the easier it is.
welding is a lot like painting a car, the prep work determines how easy it goes and how the end result looks. Get those gaps as tight as possible and just do one spot weld at a time and keep moving around. Welding sheet metal takes a lot of patience. You’re doing good work, keep
It up!
 

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Discussion Starter #92
I am learning. I just cut out a really rough piece off of a scrap piece, but they gap was way too big. I noticed if I used the aviation snips it was a bit easier, but I probably should have used a wire brush at least on the metal. I am sure it is treated with something to prevent rusting. I must say though, welding was a lot less scary than I originally thought. I thought the gun would be heavier and harder to control for some reason.
 

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I am learning. I just cut out a really rough piece off of a scrap piece, but they gap was way too big. I noticed if I used the aviation snips it was a bit easier, but I probably should have used a wire brush at least on the metal. I am sure it is treated with something to prevent rusting. I must say though, welding was a lot less scary than I originally thought. I thought the gun would be heavier and harder to control for some reason.
most things are more intimidating than they are. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and take your time. The end results are very satisfying. You’re doing great.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
most things are more intimidating than they are. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and take your time. The end results are very satisfying. You’re doing great.
I really appreciate that. :)




So progress update. Yesterday I did not do too much, I mean what I did was important, but it wasn't much. I removed all the trim from the driver's side. So side trim, door handles, mirrors, and window felt. It all came off pretty easy. I labeled everything. I took videos of how I took it off and how it goes back on. So tonight my 40 grit sand paper should be here so I can continue to strip. ;)

I also will be getting my new credit card ($400 for $3000 of spend) so once I get that I can order my turbine system, epoxy, high build, bondo, sand paper, and making stuff.

Also my heater will be here on Friday, just in time for the cold cold weather.
 

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Rather than 40 or 60 grit on a DA, I highly recommend paint stripping discs on an angle grinder to quickly get down to bare metal.

My car had about 6 layers of paint on it, as well as lots of rust and putty, so it was taking FOREVER to get it off. The poly discs were about 4 to 5 times faster than the DA.

Kev
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Rather than 40 or 60 grit on a DA, I highly recommend paint stripping discs on an angle grinder to quickly get down to bare metal.

My car had about 6 layers of paint on it, as well as lots of rust and putty, so it was taking FOREVER to get it off. The poly discs were about 4 to 5 times faster than the DA.

Kev
I used the stripping discs, and they were fast, but the clean up was a nighmare. I am hoping that the 40 will work because my shop vac can just connect to my palm sander so hopefully less mess to clean up.
 

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Body work is a dirty business.. No way around it.. Lots of sanding involved and it goes everywhere.. Walk into any body shop and you’ll find dust.. You can try to partition off your work area with plastic sheeting to contain the dust a bit so that it keeps it from going everywhere. Your shopvac may also contribute to the dust distribution through the vacuum’s exhaust port if it doesn’t have a filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
So I have made a change to the plan. I am going to just let Maaco do the whole thing.

I know it is a risk to let them do it, but my family has done 3 cars at a place in the Bay Area and they all came out good. Not going to win any best of shows or best custom paint, but they are great for cruise nights which is the level I want.

How did I make this choice:
So it started off going to local paint shop to see if they would take care of the car. The guy was not the most pleasant and he said his prices would start at $10k. Just not really what I wanted to spend. So then I started researching my local Maaco. They had pretty good reviews (I know it can be store specific) so I decided that since most of the good paint jobs come down to prep I will do that part.

So I figured up just about everything I needed to do the body work and prime the car. It was going to be about 2000 (mostly in tools that I would use once). So I called up to Maaco to actually talk to them. Long story short the guy said they could not warranty any car where they don't do the body work. That is fair. So I started to rethink my plan and it came down to:
I have seen good work from Maaco, I have read good things about this one, Most of the people complaining went as cheap as possible, I would be happy with a 5 foot paint job, the guy I talked to was really helpful, and the quote is only $200 (round trip to rent a truck and trailer). So I figured I should just let Maaco do the whole thing. I still plan on stripping the car down to bare metal and then fixing the rust holes by welding in new panels, but I will have them take care of the body work and paint.

Thoughts?
 

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I’ve done similar arrangements like that in the past. I’d do the prep work and take it in to a local One Day Paint and Body they’d shoot the color on.. They were decent and reasonable.. These were trucks that I were daily drivers not show cars.. I know a guy who has a 57 Starliner that was done at a One Day location and it was spectacular but it was not a low budget job as far as One Day goes.. I believe that Maaco has taken over the One Day locations around me.. I suspect the talent at each location will vary so if you are satisfied with the results you have seen coming out of a location that’s what will matter..
 

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So I have made a change to the plan. I am going to just let Maaco do the whole thing.

I know it is a risk to let them do it, but my family has done 3 cars at a place in the Bay Area and they all came out good. Not going to win any best of shows or best custom paint, but they are great for cruise nights which is the level I want.

How did I make this choice:
So it started off going to local paint shop to see if they would take care of the car. The guy was not the most pleasant and he said his prices would start at $10k. Just not really what I wanted to spend. So then I started researching my local Maaco. They had pretty good reviews (I know it can be store specific) so I decided that since most of the good paint jobs come down to prep I will do that part.

So I figured up just about everything I needed to do the body work and prime the car. It was going to be about 2000 (mostly in tools that I would use once). So I called up to Maaco to actually talk to them. Long story short the guy said they could not warranty any car where they don't do the body work. That is fair. So I started to rethink my plan and it came down to:
I have seen good work from Maaco, I have read good things about this one, Most of the people complaining went as cheap as possible, I would be happy with a 5 foot paint job, the guy I talked to was really helpful, and the quote is only $200 (round trip to rent a truck and trailer). So I figured I should just let Maaco do the whole thing. I still plan on stripping the car down to bare metal and then fixing the rust holes by welding in new panels, but I will have them take care of the body work and paint.

Thoughts?
I think it’s a good plan if that type of work overwhelms you. I enjoy the metal work and don’t mind doing the grunt work but I find it too tedious to get that smooth glass work. I plan on doing the stripping, priming and heavy body work but the finish work and paint will be passed on to a friend who does it for a living. I went to school for auto body 27 years ago but never really enjoyed it. Do what you enjoy and pay people to do what you don’t. It will come out better that way.
 
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