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Isn't the only difference between a bare "L-79" block and any other 362 block the letter following the Z on the pad stamp? Before assembly aren't all the blocks identical. If there is a perceived value difference it's no wonder there are restamps.

BTW...I thought Dan Miller owned both the 1967 L-79s....There's one in Oklahoma?
With the exception of the early 1966 engines, the '362' block was used for all 1966 and 1967 Chevy II 327CID engine applications.

I believe you are correct about Dan Miller owning two 1967 L79s. Jack Duer sold his to Miller last year.

Bob
 

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I hate to be rude but......I wonder what Jack got for that amazing car he had??? What's a one of less than 10unit car worth in this day and age??
 

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I hate to be rude but......I wonder what Jack got for that amazing car he had??? What's a one of less than 10unit car worth in this day and age??
It was listed in the April 2012 issue of Hemmings for $135,000.
Jack's car was fully documented with POP, original warranty book, etc. He even had an internal GM document stating these cars were going to be built, including the time line for production.

Bob
 

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Very interesting. I've been sitting on a 67 corvette l79 engine for a couple of years now. Considered putting it into my 63 hard top that has been in body shop hell for ever. I just gave the car to my 19 year old son last week. Dropping in an I6 backed by a 200r4 in a few weeks.
 

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After the block was hot tanked and before I painted it, I saw what looks like a faint angle like the ''K'' you refer to. I too wondered if it could be a K but looking at it real closely under magnification it appears that the angle is too far away from the vertical I to match up. The angle also is so faint one can barely see it with a naked eye. It isn't logical that the ''I'' can be so prominent and the angle almost imperceptical if applied with a stamp. The angle ''looks'' more like small corrosion pits than lines made with a stamp.

Obviously, I can't know for sure what it is without some experts looking it over. There are those who will always be skeptical no matter what. I do know the last 30 year history of the block and if it was intentionally altered, it was done 30 or more years ago. The person I purchased it from would have had no reason to alter it in the 30 years he owned it. IMO, 30 years ago that block wasn't worth scrap value. Wouldn't have made sense to go through the trouble to alter it. Anything is possible....
I'll likely just finish assembling it and install it in my '65 SS as I intended all along.

Ronniexjs

Old thread, but good to close the loop. Here's a few pictures of how the K looks on those stamps. Its not the type of common K font you are used to seeing these days. Makes it much more clear that there was once a K there where the I in this block is now. Still a nice and valuable block today.
 

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With the exception of early production, the '362' block was used for all 327 applications (L30 & L79) in 1966 and 1967. I think the engine being discussed in this thread is a re-stamp. I agree with Army that the last letter in the suffix was likely a 'K.' 'I' was used as both a number and a letter in most Flint codes. In this case, the diagonal pieces of the 'K' have been ground off (almost), leaving just the vertical piece looking like a '1' instead of an 'I'.

Bob
 

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Does anyone know if it's possible to determine the original VIN number of a 1967 Nova from the Engine number stamped on the engine block? The reason I ask is this:
I have an engine block that I believe is from an original 1967 L-79 Nova. Here's why; The casting number is 3791362 with a date code of A197 (January 19, 1967). The engine stamped code is V0322ZI. The stamping, I'm convinced can be authenticated as original, at least not a re-stamp. There are other historical details that lead me to the conclusion that it's original.

I understand that there were only a handful of 1967 L-79 Novas built and believe that this engine could be very desirable to the the owner of the original car that it was installed when built.
If that car can be identified and located, I would be interested in putting the two together. My plans were to install this engine in my 1965 Nova SS but when I found out how rare this block is, I am having other thoughts. Thanks for any help!

Ronniexjs.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
I also have a 3791362 block / complete engine with casting date A197 (Jan 19 1967) with no stamping on the block pad heads casting number 3890462 and winters intake casting number 3890490 trying to decide wither to build a clone or sell the complete engine.
 

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I also have a 3791362 block / complete engine with casting date A197 (Jan 19 1967) with no stamping on the block pad heads casting number 3890462 and winters intake casting number 3890490 trying to decide wither to build a clone or sell the complete engine.
Mike, I think I mentioned to you previously that after the end of October, 1966, all Chevy II 327 applications used the '362' block through the end of 1967. This included the L30 275 HP and L79 350/325 HP. Similarly, the '462' heads were used on these 327 applications during the same period. The '490' aluminum intake was only used on the 1966 Chevy II L79. The '67 Chevy II L79 had an orange painted cast iron intake. The known 1967 L79s have engine cast and assembly dates in May and June, 1967, so a January build appears to be too early to be a 1967 L79 engine. While there is no definitive proof, it appears your engine could be a 1967 L30 (275HP) 327 with a transplanted '490' intake on it. This is my take after 30 plus years in the Chevy II world, but I would appreciate the opinion of other members.

Bob
 

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Mike, I think I mentioned to you previously that after the end of October, 1966, all Chevy II 327 applications used the '362' block through the end of 1967. This included the L30 275 HP and L79 350/325 HP. Similarly, the '462' heads were used on these 327 applications during the same period. The '490' aluminum intake was only used on the 1966 Chevy II L79. The '67 Chevy II L79 had an orange painted cast iron intake. The known 1967 L79s have engine cast and assembly dates in May and June, 1967, so a January build appears to be too early to be a 1967 L79 engine. While there is no definitive proof, it appears your engine could be a 1967 L30 (275HP) 327 with a transplanted '490' intake on it. This is my take after 30 plus years in the Chevy II world, but I would appreciate the opinion of other members.

Bob
Yes I realize that you had mentioned it but I was inquiring as whether to find a Chevy II and build a clone of the 1967 Sports Coupe or just sell the engine complete
Thanks
 
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