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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I am looking for the actual number or series of this box - 1966 Chevy 2, long shaft. I am trying to find a kit but I am unable to cross reference the stamping numbers.

Anyone knows what number this is or what series of box (not 800, 808, 605)?
Stamping # 5878078 does not bring up any numbers...

Thanks in advance
Frank

Gas Artifact Font Auto part Metal
 

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That number is a casting number, probably just for the housing, which will normally not be in the GM parts books. The parts books will have an assembly number (I don't know it). The Chevy II gear box externally is the same 1962 - 66, I would guess internally as well.

Are you trying to rebuild it?

~UPDATE~
In the GM books I have it looks like there was not a complete assembly available, everything came as parts. The housing was available under that number until 1969. There is no mention of series. The Chevy II gear box is pretty unique with GM cars of the period. The Corvette had something similar.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you sure it's a long shaft? that number is coming up for a 67 box. I have one in the garage that has the same number.
Yes I am sure

Wood Tool Workbench Gas Engineering

That number is a casting number, probably just for the housing, which will normally not be in the GM parts books. The parts books will have an assembly number (I don't know it). The Chevy II gear box externally is the same 1962 - 66, I would guess internally as well.

Are you trying to rebuild it?
Yes. I open it, clean, and adjust. I do it on all my boxes. I am a licensed tech, and even my suppliers don't have a listing. C2 only seems to have a generic pitman seal.

Any ideas? Cheers
Wood Tool Workbench Gas Engineering
 

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me being a novice, is there a simple way to tell if the gear box is good, the way you have it there on the bench in the photo?

also, what lube do you typically refill yours with?

thanks!

-Rusty
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
me being a novice, is there a simple way to tell if the gear box is good, the way you have it there on the bench in the photo?

also, what lube do you typically refill yours with?

thanks!

-Rusty
Without opening the box, the only thing you can check is the preload and obvious slop. I have a dial torque wrench that I install on the input ( long shaft) and measure the effort to turn the box, and more importantly the "over center" reading, which is always higher - harder. Most boxes I have done that are no good have hard spots throughout the turning range, this is a good indicator that things are going wrong. Slop in the input and sector shaft has to be looked at carefully. I usually open the box, inspect it, change seals, clean it out, change the lubrication, and adjust it to specs. I have used a light lithium grease, Moly slip liquid grease, and John Dear Cornhead grease, all with great results. This really makes a difference in the way the car controls. The only thing is I have been doing boxes before the beginning of time lol, so depends on your know how and if you can follow YouTube videos. Really not that difficult.
Cheers
 

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many years ago when i worked construction we would get a job in plant #3 saginaw steering gear. it was kind of interesting watching those steering boxes being assembled.
 

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Without opening the box, the only thing you can check is the preload and obvious slop. I have a dial torque wrench that I install on the input ( long shaft) and measure the effort to turn the box, and more importantly the "over center" reading, which is always higher - harder. Most boxes I have done that are no good have hard spots throughout the turning range, this is a good indicator that things are going wrong. Slop in the input and sector shaft has to be looked at carefully. I usually open the box, inspect it, change seals, clean it out, change the lubrication, and adjust it to specs. I have used a light lithium grease, Moly slip liquid grease, and John Dear Cornhead grease, all with great results. This really makes a difference in the way the car controls. The only thing is I have been doing boxes before the beginning of time lol, so depends on your know how and if you can follow YouTube videos. Really not that difficult.
Cheers
any chance you know the acceptable specs for steering wheel play and accepted method (where those specs are measured at, since travel will differ based on the diameter of the "circle" used)?

thanks.

-Rusty
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
any chance you know the acceptable specs for steering wheel play and accepted method (where those specs are measured at, since travel will differ based on the diameter of the "circle" used)?

thanks.

-Rusty

Hi Rusty

There is no spec for "play" as per say. Whith preload, this is how tight the gears are pushed together, so technically there is no play/slop. I set my manual boxes preload to 2-4 inch pounds, and around 10 inch pounds over center. There is a procedure to measure preload from the steering wheel, but I try not to do it that way as it measures the preload of the column as well as the box, but with the 63 to 66 car it is an acceptable process due to the complexity of the removal of the box.

If I use my car as an example: I opened the box yesterday and as expected, the grease had turned to clay and one bearing was completely shot. Pittman seal was leaking. In my column, the top bearing was just packed with dog hair and the lower column bushing was almost disintegrated. Where I am going whith this story is that my car would have not been a successful candidate for the - from the steering wheel - type adjustment. There were too many other factors that would have thrown out the reading. In fact, the last 5 boxes I serviced had issues. I ended up ordering a kit from Ebay for 45$.

Hope that made sense
 

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makes sense. any chance you have the link for that ebay kit?

somewhere i saw that it was something like 2" of play is normal. absolutely cannot find it, nor did i notice where they measured it from.

when you have hooked it all back up, would you be willing to measure play in cm or inches the way i have it here in the photo? would love to know how a new box with good suspension parts is supposed to move. it at least provides a benchmark for a rebuilt box. please see pic below:
Hood Light Automotive design Motor vehicle Gauge


basically, i started all the way at the left end of the dead zone, then move to the right where it just nibbles at micromovement of the tire. it was ~1.8 - 2.0 cm. or for standard measurers, about 3/4 in.

unless you mean your wheels start to turn after 0.2 cm in either direction. but curious what it is, nonetheless.

again, thanks for your time.

-Rusty
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
makes sense. any chance you have the link for that ebay kit?

somewhere i saw that it was something like 2" of play is normal. absolutely cannot find it, nor did i notice where they measured it from.

when you have hooked it all back up, would you be willing to measure play in cm or inches the way i have it here in the photo? would love to know how a new box with good suspension parts is supposed to move. it at least provides a benchmark for a rebuilt box. please see pic below: View attachment 440471

basically, i started all the way at the left end of the dead zone, then move to the right where it just nibbles at micromovement of the tire. it was ~1.8 - 2.0 cm. or for standard measurers, about 3/4 in.

unless you mean your wheels start to turn after 0.2 cm in either direction. but curious what it is, nonetheless.

again, thanks for your time.

-Rusty

Oh yes for sure there will be some play at the steering wheel. In a linkage style steering, there is a lot of rubber that has a bit of give to it, that needs to be tooken up before the front wheels react.

1963-1982 Corvette Steering Gear Box Rebuild Kit | eBay

This is the kit I got less the brass bushings. When replacing the brass bushings, a qualified machine shop is needed. There is another kit from the same vender with just gaskets and seals. I should get the kit in a couple weeks, i hope its the right one.

My cars a long way from checking the play like your picture ... mine is getting fixed lol (its stripped).

Cheers
 

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Oh yes for sure there will be some play at the steering wheel. In a linkage style steering, there is a lot of rubber that has a bit of give to it, that needs to be tooken up before the front wheels react.

1963-1982 Corvette Steering Gear Box Rebuild Kit | eBay

This is the kit I got less the brass bushings. When replacing the brass bushings, a qualified machine shop is needed. There is another kit from the same vender with just gaskets and seals. I should get the kit in a couple weeks, i hope its the right one.

My cars a long way from checking the play like your picture ... mine is getting fixed lol (its stripped).

Cheers
thanks for the link, very helpful.

wow, those brass bushings bumped it up from $45 to $114? guess brass is pricey, not up on metal costs these days.

-Rusty
 
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