Chevy Nova Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody, I have the original 194 inline 6 in my car that runs great with 115,000 miles on it but is extremely oily. the oil is getting on the exhaust manifold and smoking off and I'm worried that it will catch fire. I'm pretty sure the rear main seal along with every other one is bad as oil is thrown all under the car and around the engine bay and when the car is hot it will drip oil all over the ground. I'm trying to decide whether to pull the engine and redo all the seals with my limited equipment or work on it while it is in the car. I don't have an engine stand or hoist and am trying to do this on a small budget. I just want a non-leaking engine. With the amount of miles on the engine should I replace the rod and main bearings and rings while I'm at it with this kit? Chevy 194 1963-1967 Re-Ring Kit from Northern Auto Parts
I don't want to end up with more issues with the car because it runs great I just want to avoid doing things over and I only have about a week where I can do it in a garage. I'm pretty sure it has significant blowby so the rings could be changed but would I run into any other issues other than just getting the kit, tearing it down, and just throwing the new parts on or should i just stick to the gaskets?
Is it possible to get the car on stands and do the work underneath it? What would I have to remove to get the pan off/replace rear main seal.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
You're not going to be able to remove the oil pan with the engine in the car... There's just too much in the way. You can get to pretty much everything else gasket-wise except the rear main seal. For that, you'll have to either pull the engine or the transmission. If it were me, with a good running engine, I'd leave it in the car and replace the gaskets I could get to.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,640 Posts
Just had a similar dilemma. I sucked it up and pulled the engine. Didn't have to rush, didn't have anything go splat in my eyes, had good access to everything. Try to find my favorite type of engine hoist to use: SOMEONE ELSE'S. If you were located in SoCal you could use mine. But the rear main seal will be tough to get right with the engine in the car, and cleaning it and doing all the oil leaks, especially if the front oil seal at the timing gear cover is leaky, will be so much easier out of the car. I'd pull the engine with the trans and re-install it the same way, but that's just style points.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Remove the engine, definitely. It’s not as hard as you think, and engine lifts are cheap at Harbor Freight. This would be an excellent time to replace all the belts and hoses, and replace the clutch disc if it’s a stick shift. I’ve used several of the kits from Northern, they are quality parts at a very reasonable price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,223 Posts
10 - 4 . . . . . I agree with everyone = need too remove the engine , makes everything better . . . and,
does work better . PLUS = by just replacing all those gaskets - - - - - - if you don't really clean
up everything . . it could make it hard going forward too find a 'new leak' on a dirty engine ' .

just my 2cents , later , jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses everybody! I ordered the kit from northern auto parts and will pull the engine. What do I need to remove to take the engine out? Engine and trans both or just the engine? Last thing where to lift the engine from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
I haven't done this on a 1st gen Nova, but I've pulled the engine a few times from my 3rd gen and pulled a number of other engines from different kinds of cars and trucks. For me I found it easiest to remove the transmission or just pull it back from the engine and leave it under the car, then pull just the engine by itself. Some like to pull them both at the same time; it's just more to handle and more to disconnect in my opinion, but do what works for you.If you go this route, you will want to unbolt the flyweel or flexplate from the transmission, support the transmission with a strap between the frame rails or a jack, support the engine on the hoist, then unbolt the bellhousing from the engine, the transmission mount, and pull the transmission back until the engine is clear. I think you will have pretty good access to the bolts with an inline 6, but if not you may find a series of extensions and u-joints from under the car will help you get all the bellhousing bolts.

You will have to disconnect the fuel line, any wiring/electrical going to the engine (including grounds traps), and the exhaust manifold. You'll also want to remove the radiator, waterpump/fan, and some or all the accessories to make the job easier. I would probably just get it down to a longblock before trying to pull it out of the car. It also helps to remove the hood to get more access for the hoist - I'm not sure if you could even get the engine out with the hood on as I've never tried. If you have power steering, you can often unbolt the steering pump and set it aside or wire it to a nearby fender without draining the fluid or disconnecting the lines. The same goes for an AC compressor.

On an inline 6 the hoist can be attached by chain at the front and rear of the cylinder head on bolts that are diagonal from one another. If there are larger fastener holes at the front and rear of the head you should probably use those. I have always used chain and hooked the hoist to whatever link of the chain allows me to remove the engine at a suitable angle. When the engine is supported by the hoist, the last thing to remove are the motor mount bolts. From that point lift very slowly and look around the engine for anything missed. I've pulled a number of engines and I can't tell you how many times a bolt or wire was missed or something was hanging up that required a nudge of the engine in one direction or another. If it doesn't seem to be lifting, stop what you're doing and look over things to make sure you're not about to break a line or damage something.

Once an engine is supported by a hoist, you can have one person moving / twisting the engine as needed to get things to clear while the other person operates the hoist to lift the engine higher or roll the hoist in whatever direction is needed. Try to avoid turning the hoist or moving it side-to-side because it can be less stable that direction. Also never push the boom of the hoist left and right - you should be driving the hoist from the frame so it doesn't get tipsy.

Once out of the car, you will find it's a lot easier to work on the engine if you attach it to a good stand. Never use a 3 leg stand - they are very easy to tip over. I had my iron block and iron head SBC fall over me on a 3 leg stand once and thankfully even though it fell on top of me, the block landed next to my body and nothing crushed me. I have always used a 4 leg stand since then and they are much more stable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
If it is an automatic I would also replace the front main seal. You need to ask someone on here on what and how to do it.
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks again for all the responses! It's the manual 3 on the tree so I'll just leave the transmission in place.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,640 Posts
I have done a number of manual trans engine pulls. I'd pull the trans with the engine. A couple of things I would do:

1) either drain the trans of oil or put a plug in the rear at the seal where the driveshaft yoke goes. Otherwise, huge oil mess
2) remove the R-1/2-3 shift rods from the column and out of the car so they are out of the way
3) purchase an engine leveler that adjusts the angle of the engine when it's on the hoist. MUCH easier
4) jack stands under the rear of the car, and blocks chocking the front wheels in place (better angle)
5) positively and securely plug the fuel line where it disconnects from the fuel pump
6) definitely remove fan and pulley and radiator
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
729 Posts
I agree with eveyone else. Pull the transmission and engine together. It will be a lot easier to put them back together out of the car rather than trying to get the transmission and engine together in the car. When I pull mine in my 63 I remove the bumper, radiator, and radiator core support. Don't have to take the hood off and I can get the engine out and back in by myself pretty easily. The engine leveler is a big help as someone mentioned.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top